The art of the biased photo

By

Here is an example of the way the New York Times uses photos to send a propaganda message. For coverage of the swearing in of Justice Alito, it ran a picture of Watergater Chuck Colson.

Of all the dignitaries in attendance at Justice Alito's swearing—in, The Times focuses in on the only figure in the room capable of generating strong liberal feelings of disgust to run in its print edition and website.

The hard—as—nails Watergate figure who would "walk over his grandmother" for Nixon. The same hated Colson who became an evangelical Christian of enormous impact and influence internationally, via the Prisoner Fellowship. Chuck Colson is demonic in the eyes of orthodox liberals. Colson pushes just the right buttons to make Times readers very uncomfortable about the new Supreme Court Justice.
 
The photo is in my print ediiton.

Ed Lasky   2 02 06

Here is an example of the way the New York Times uses photos to send a propaganda message. For coverage of the swearing in of Justice Alito, it ran a picture of Watergater Chuck Colson.

Of all the dignitaries in attendance at Justice Alito's swearing—in, The Times focuses in on the only figure in the room capable of generating strong liberal feelings of disgust to run in its print edition and website.

The hard—as—nails Watergate figure who would "walk over his grandmother" for Nixon. The same hated Colson who became an evangelical Christian of enormous impact and influence internationally, via the Prisoner Fellowship. Chuck Colson is demonic in the eyes of orthodox liberals. Colson pushes just the right buttons to make Times readers very uncomfortable about the new Supreme Court Justice.
 
The photo is in my print ediiton.

Ed Lasky   2 02 06