Some ads are more equal than others

The liberal mainstream press has come up with a new way to stem its falling revenues. An "open forum" op—ed article in the San Francisco Chronicle calls for the federal government to ban all TELEVISION AND RADIO commercials for new cars. 

"I propose creating a similar ban on all automobile—related television and radio advertising in the United States. I am asking Congress to take the lead in helping to wean Americans, particularly the younger generations, off the fixations that glamorize cars. Getting rid of the TV ads will mitigate the lusting after cars and the constant purported need to purchase a new one every few years."

The writer compared this proposal to the banning of cigarette advertising, which probably lowered smoking rates in the US. But transportation isn't a necessarily unhealthy activity. Still, this makes a great liberal fantasy which will never get through Congress, even after the hoped—for victory of Democrats in the 2006 elections either does or does not occur.

Of course, with no ban on newspaper or magazine ads, the antique press would surely see their advertising revenues skyrocket, saving them from extinction. I don't live near San Francisco, but I bet this same "high minded" newspaper has ample car ads. They even an Autos section in their online newspaper with — horrors! — new car ads!
 
This is nothing less than the San Francisco Chronicle editorializing to outline a competitive form of media's advertising by government decree. And you thought Stalin was dead.
 
Jack Kemp (not the politician)  2 06 06

The liberal mainstream press has come up with a new way to stem its falling revenues. An "open forum" op—ed article in the San Francisco Chronicle calls for the federal government to ban all TELEVISION AND RADIO commercials for new cars. 

"I propose creating a similar ban on all automobile—related television and radio advertising in the United States. I am asking Congress to take the lead in helping to wean Americans, particularly the younger generations, off the fixations that glamorize cars. Getting rid of the TV ads will mitigate the lusting after cars and the constant purported need to purchase a new one every few years."

The writer compared this proposal to the banning of cigarette advertising, which probably lowered smoking rates in the US. But transportation isn't a necessarily unhealthy activity. Still, this makes a great liberal fantasy which will never get through Congress, even after the hoped—for victory of Democrats in the 2006 elections either does or does not occur.

Of course, with no ban on newspaper or magazine ads, the antique press would surely see their advertising revenues skyrocket, saving them from extinction. I don't live near San Francisco, but I bet this same "high minded" newspaper has ample car ads. They even an Autos section in their online newspaper with — horrors! — new car ads!
 
This is nothing less than the San Francisco Chronicle editorializing to outline a competitive form of media's advertising by government decree. And you thought Stalin was dead.
 
Jack Kemp (not the politician)  2 06 06