SNAPSHOT(an occasional feature)

From "While Europe Slept" by Bruce Bawer (page 181). On Denmark's immigration policy and a study by Eyvind Vesselbo, a cultural sociologist:

Vesselbo selected a cohort of 145 Turkish men who, emigrating to Denmark as guest workers in 1969 and 1970, settled in the town of Ishoj, which has since become heavily Muslim. By the year 2000, when Vesselbo's study was completed, the importation of spouses and other family members, combined with high fertility rate, had turned this group of 145 into a community of 2,813. Those who had married had all married Turkish women whom they brought over to Denmark under "family reunification." Some of these men were later divorced or widowed and then remarried, again to Turkish women. Three married yet a third time—and, again, in each case the wife was a Turkish import. The rate of "fetching marriages" among this group was then OVER 100 percent, while the average number of children per family was 6.4—several times the overall Danish average"

Of the ninety—eight married sons and daughters of Vesselbo's original 145 immigrants, eight—nine wed spouses imported from Turkey, seven married Turks already living in Denmark, and one married a Turk living in Sweden. Only one married a Dane with no Turkish background. There were ten second marriages — all to Turks. Among the third generation, there had already been sixty—two marriages by 2000 — all but two of them "fetching marriages" (imported Turkish wives).

Ed Lasky   2 27 06

From "While Europe Slept" by Bruce Bawer (page 181). On Denmark's immigration policy and a study by Eyvind Vesselbo, a cultural sociologist:

Vesselbo selected a cohort of 145 Turkish men who, emigrating to Denmark as guest workers in 1969 and 1970, settled in the town of Ishoj, which has since become heavily Muslim. By the year 2000, when Vesselbo's study was completed, the importation of spouses and other family members, combined with high fertility rate, had turned this group of 145 into a community of 2,813. Those who had married had all married Turkish women whom they brought over to Denmark under "family reunification." Some of these men were later divorced or widowed and then remarried, again to Turkish women. Three married yet a third time—and, again, in each case the wife was a Turkish import. The rate of "fetching marriages" among this group was then OVER 100 percent, while the average number of children per family was 6.4—several times the overall Danish average"

Of the ninety—eight married sons and daughters of Vesselbo's original 145 immigrants, eight—nine wed spouses imported from Turkey, seven married Turks already living in Denmark, and one married a Turk living in Sweden. Only one married a Dane with no Turkish background. There were ten second marriages — all to Turks. Among the third generation, there had already been sixty—two marriages by 2000 — all but two of them "fetching marriages" (imported Turkish wives).

Ed Lasky   2 27 06