More good news from Canada

As predicted by Paul Jackson on these pages, Canada's new prime minister Stephen Harper is moving to make the confirmation process for Canada's supreme court justices more politically accountable to parliament. According to the Globe and Mail his first choice for a vacancy on Canada's top bench will

make Canadian history as the first appointee to face a public, all—party review before being formally named to the Supreme Court of Canada.

The review won't have formal veto power, but it is step in the direction of greater judicial accountability, a constitutional bow in the direction of checks and balances, as promised by Harper.

Meanwhile the new Harper government also makes good on another prediction of Jackson's: announcing plans to bolster Canada's armed forces by 13,000, so as to take a more active role in the global war on terror. Canada's C—news reports:

Canada's military will have more troops and better equipment as it takes a more aggressive role fighting terrorism and protecting Arctic sovereignty, Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor pledged in his first major policy speech since taking office.

Sketching out the Conservative government's ambitious plan for beefed—up armed forces, O'Connor said Canada remains committed to the dangerous mission in Afghanistan, adding it is "quite representative" of the aggressive missions that will become the future norm.

"The security situation on the ground is volatile and, sadly, we have already experienced casualties," he said. "But I can assure you Canada will not be intimidated or deterred by terrorists."

The good news from north of the border continues.

As predicted by Paul Jackson on these pages, Canada's new prime minister Stephen Harper is moving to make the confirmation process for Canada's supreme court justices more politically accountable to parliament. According to the Globe and Mail his first choice for a vacancy on Canada's top bench will

make Canadian history as the first appointee to face a public, all—party review before being formally named to the Supreme Court of Canada.

The review won't have formal veto power, but it is step in the direction of greater judicial accountability, a constitutional bow in the direction of checks and balances, as promised by Harper.

Meanwhile the new Harper government also makes good on another prediction of Jackson's: announcing plans to bolster Canada's armed forces by 13,000, so as to take a more active role in the global war on terror. Canada's C—news reports:

Canada's military will have more troops and better equipment as it takes a more aggressive role fighting terrorism and protecting Arctic sovereignty, Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor pledged in his first major policy speech since taking office.

Sketching out the Conservative government's ambitious plan for beefed—up armed forces, O'Connor said Canada remains committed to the dangerous mission in Afghanistan, adding it is "quite representative" of the aggressive missions that will become the future norm.

"The security situation on the ground is volatile and, sadly, we have already experienced casualties," he said. "But I can assure you Canada will not be intimidated or deterred by terrorists."

The good news from north of the border continues.