France enters the Muhammad cartoon row

The conservative French daily newspaper France Soir has published the cartoons which engendered a Muslim boycott and other pressure on Denmark. The BBC reports:

France Soir said it had published the cartoons to show that "religious dogma" had no place in a secular society.

Their publication in Denmark has led to protests in several Arab nations.

Responding to France Soir's move, the French government said it supported press freedom — but added that beliefs and religions must be respected.

Islamic tradition bans depictions of the Prophet Muhammad or Allah.

Under the headline "Yes, we have the right to caricature God", France Soir ran a front page cartoon of Buddhist, Jewish, Muslim and Christian gods floating on a cloud.

It shows the Christian deity saying: "Don't complain, Muhammad, we've all been caricatured here."

The full set of Danish drawings, some of which depict the Prophet Muhammad as a terrorist, were printed on the inside pages.

So far, I have noticed the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE), or any of the major journalism award—givers joining the crusade against Sharia censorship.

What does it say when the French are more princiupled and brave than a group of American professionals?

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

Thomas Lifson  2 01 06

UPDATE:

Ethel Fenig writes:

Will American Thinker have to swallow hard  and now urge its readers to Buy French?  It just might happen because a French paper published the Danish cartoons that so easily propelled the Arab/Moslem world to another dangerous snit. 
 
And it was done deliberately. Provocatively.

The statement released by France Soir reads they published the cartoons as a provocation.

The caricatures may seem to be unimportant, insulting or they may even seem to have an important meaning, but their publication has tested the boundaries of freedom of speech in Denmark and angered the Muslim World, the France Soir statement further reads.

And they won't even apologize.
 
The same statement backed not to existence of any expressions against any racist intention and any society. 'No, we will never apologize as we are sorry while we are talking and thinking. We will never apologize for being free to speak and think,' while reminding that it does not support expressions of hatred and racism. 

Of  course some French government official just might apologize for a French citizen actually upholding an honored French right.  It will be interesting to see how what happens.
 
Ethel C. Fenig
 
hat tip:  Dhimmi Watch

The conservative French daily newspaper France Soir has published the cartoons which engendered a Muslim boycott and other pressure on Denmark. The BBC reports:

France Soir said it had published the cartoons to show that "religious dogma" had no place in a secular society.

Their publication in Denmark has led to protests in several Arab nations.

Responding to France Soir's move, the French government said it supported press freedom — but added that beliefs and religions must be respected.

Islamic tradition bans depictions of the Prophet Muhammad or Allah.

Under the headline "Yes, we have the right to caricature God", France Soir ran a front page cartoon of Buddhist, Jewish, Muslim and Christian gods floating on a cloud.

It shows the Christian deity saying: "Don't complain, Muhammad, we've all been caricatured here."

The full set of Danish drawings, some of which depict the Prophet Muhammad as a terrorist, were printed on the inside pages.

So far, I have noticed the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE), or any of the major journalism award—givers joining the crusade against Sharia censorship.

What does it say when the French are more princiupled and brave than a group of American professionals?

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

Thomas Lifson  2 01 06

UPDATE:

Ethel Fenig writes:

Will American Thinker have to swallow hard  and now urge its readers to Buy French?  It just might happen because a French paper published the Danish cartoons that so easily propelled the Arab/Moslem world to another dangerous snit. 
 
And it was done deliberately. Provocatively.

The statement released by France Soir reads they published the cartoons as a provocation.

The caricatures may seem to be unimportant, insulting or they may even seem to have an important meaning, but their publication has tested the boundaries of freedom of speech in Denmark and angered the Muslim World, the France Soir statement further reads.

And they won't even apologize.
 
The same statement backed not to existence of any expressions against any racist intention and any society. 'No, we will never apologize as we are sorry while we are talking and thinking. We will never apologize for being free to speak and think,' while reminding that it does not support expressions of hatred and racism. 

Of  course some French government official just might apologize for a French citizen actually upholding an honored French right.  It will be interesting to see how what happens.
 
Ethel C. Fenig
 
hat tip:  Dhimmi Watch