Bolton acts while Kofi dithers

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UN ambassador John Bolton pushes for action on Darfur, while Nobel Prize (and Dubai) Prize—winner Kofi Annan avoids comment. Benny Avni of The New York Sun reports:

American Ambassador John Bolton admitted yesterday that despite his best efforts, the U.N. Security Council was not likely to pass measures to stop the carnage in Darfur before the end of February. Secretary—General Annan, meanwhile, did not even discuss Sudan during a weekend visit to Qatar, whose U.N. ambassador is one of three council members blocking American—proposed measures.

Mr. Annan went as Qatar's guest for a U.N.—related conference on an "alliance among civilizations" as Muslims riot against Western cartoons. He has recently chided America for not doing enough on Darfur, but declined to criticize Sudan's allies. The issue of Sudan "did not come up" during his meetings in Doha, spokeswoman Marie Okabe, told The New York Sun yesterday.

American diplomats are disappointed that since joining the 15—member Security Council this year, with Washington's backing, Qatar has followed a hard line when representing the Arab group. Ambassador Nassir Abdulaziz al—Nasser has disagreed with America on several issues, most notably Sudan. Along with China and Russia, Qatar blocked proposals to impose sanctions on Sudanese officials and militia leaders singled out for punishment by a U.N. panel of experts.

Ed Lasky   2 28 06

UN ambassador John Bolton pushes for action on Darfur, while Nobel Prize (and Dubai) Prize—winner Kofi Annan avoids comment. Benny Avni of The New York Sun reports:

American Ambassador John Bolton admitted yesterday that despite his best efforts, the U.N. Security Council was not likely to pass measures to stop the carnage in Darfur before the end of February. Secretary—General Annan, meanwhile, did not even discuss Sudan during a weekend visit to Qatar, whose U.N. ambassador is one of three council members blocking American—proposed measures.

Mr. Annan went as Qatar's guest for a U.N.—related conference on an "alliance among civilizations" as Muslims riot against Western cartoons. He has recently chided America for not doing enough on Darfur, but declined to criticize Sudan's allies. The issue of Sudan "did not come up" during his meetings in Doha, spokeswoman Marie Okabe, told The New York Sun yesterday.

American diplomats are disappointed that since joining the 15—member Security Council this year, with Washington's backing, Qatar has followed a hard line when representing the Arab group. Ambassador Nassir Abdulaziz al—Nasser has disagreed with America on several issues, most notably Sudan. Along with China and Russia, Qatar blocked proposals to impose sanctions on Sudanese officials and militia leaders singled out for punishment by a U.N. panel of experts.

Ed Lasky   2 28 06