The chocolate city

The MSM are fond of cliche—ing that the recent Katrina devastation and response  in New Orleans exposed America's racism.

Well yeah, but not the way they mean.  All the sensationalist reporting about cannibalism in the Superdome, blacks suffering disproportionately more, neglect by the wealthy white (read Republican Bush) establishment and government has been proven wrong, wrong, wrong.  But yet the myths endure partially because the liberal media cannot/will not drop its biases.

And so it will be interesting to see the reaction to the latest coming from New Orleans.

In a speech dishonoring Martin Luther King's memory, New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin cleverly shifted the blame for his own incompetence during that terrible time onto none other than...God! 

Yep, God.

"Surely God is mad at America. He sent us hurricane after hurricane after hurricane, and it's destroyed and put stress on this country," Nagin, who is black, said as he and other city leaders marked Martin Luther King Day.

"Surely he doesn't approve of us being in Iraq under false pretenses. But surely he is upset at black America also. We're not taking care of ourselves."

Hmm, Pat Robertson was rightly condemned for stating that God punished Ariel Sharon with a stroke because of disapproval of Sharon's withdrawal from Gaza.  Will Nagin receive the same treatment or, more likely, praise for bravely stating the truth?  

Invoking the deity again to justify, uh, segregation, Nagin added that

"It's time for us to come together. It's time for us to rebuild New Orleans — the one that should be a chocolate New Orleans," the mayor said. "This city will be a majority African American city. It's the way God wants it to be. You can't have New Orleans no other way. It wouldn't be New Orleans."

Gee, not even a chocolate city with vanilla, lemon and tan sprinkles? Imagine of David Duke or anyone else called on a city with a growing black population to stay a white city.
 
Probably so much attention will be focused on these issues that his other courageous statements about black on black crime, poor black leadership and the need for the black community to "fix itself" will be ignored.

Too bad.  But that's the way God wants it I guess.

Ethel C. Fenig   1 17 06

The MSM are fond of cliche—ing that the recent Katrina devastation and response  in New Orleans exposed America's racism.

Well yeah, but not the way they mean.  All the sensationalist reporting about cannibalism in the Superdome, blacks suffering disproportionately more, neglect by the wealthy white (read Republican Bush) establishment and government has been proven wrong, wrong, wrong.  But yet the myths endure partially because the liberal media cannot/will not drop its biases.

And so it will be interesting to see the reaction to the latest coming from New Orleans.

In a speech dishonoring Martin Luther King's memory, New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin cleverly shifted the blame for his own incompetence during that terrible time onto none other than...God! 

Yep, God.

"Surely God is mad at America. He sent us hurricane after hurricane after hurricane, and it's destroyed and put stress on this country," Nagin, who is black, said as he and other city leaders marked Martin Luther King Day.

"Surely he doesn't approve of us being in Iraq under false pretenses. But surely he is upset at black America also. We're not taking care of ourselves."

Hmm, Pat Robertson was rightly condemned for stating that God punished Ariel Sharon with a stroke because of disapproval of Sharon's withdrawal from Gaza.  Will Nagin receive the same treatment or, more likely, praise for bravely stating the truth?  

Invoking the deity again to justify, uh, segregation, Nagin added that

"It's time for us to come together. It's time for us to rebuild New Orleans — the one that should be a chocolate New Orleans," the mayor said. "This city will be a majority African American city. It's the way God wants it to be. You can't have New Orleans no other way. It wouldn't be New Orleans."

Gee, not even a chocolate city with vanilla, lemon and tan sprinkles? Imagine of David Duke or anyone else called on a city with a growing black population to stay a white city.
 
Probably so much attention will be focused on these issues that his other courageous statements about black on black crime, poor black leadership and the need for the black community to "fix itself" will be ignored.

Too bad.  But that's the way God wants it I guess.

Ethel C. Fenig   1 17 06