Russia's phony posturing on Iran

Russia is once again thwarting  the efforts by the United States to take real measures against a dangerous rogue state. To pretend that Russia is some kind of serious diplomatic arbitrator in the current Iran nuclear standoff is simply preposterous. The Russians have no interest in helping to halt Iran's nuclear program, since they have a huge financial stake in it themselves. They are, for instance, building $800—million Bushehr nuclear power plant in the south of Iran.

The Russians need to be called out on this by our negotiators so that the world sees who is on whose side. We must stop playing this silly diplomatic game in which everybody is accepted by default as a well—meaning partner intent on bringing about a satisfactory resolution. The Russians are not sincere in this. In fact, they are hardly sincere about anything these days. Worryingly, their shenanigans are becoming increasingly reminiscent of their Soviet predecessors.

Vasko Kohlmayer   1 19 06

Thomas Lifson adds:

I think it is fine for those of us in the blogosphere to call 'em as we see them, but I am not certain that it is always a good idea to speak bluntly in diplomatic relations. I am not certain it is the right time to move diplomatic relations to a more openly hostile basis. I simply don't know all the secret stuff that is at stake.

There's a lot I don't know about the current realpolitik. I agree that the Russians increasingly are moving to a hostile posture. I have no doubt Sec. Rice is well—aware of this and is working on getting our way.

Russia is once again thwarting  the efforts by the United States to take real measures against a dangerous rogue state. To pretend that Russia is some kind of serious diplomatic arbitrator in the current Iran nuclear standoff is simply preposterous. The Russians have no interest in helping to halt Iran's nuclear program, since they have a huge financial stake in it themselves. They are, for instance, building $800—million Bushehr nuclear power plant in the south of Iran.

The Russians need to be called out on this by our negotiators so that the world sees who is on whose side. We must stop playing this silly diplomatic game in which everybody is accepted by default as a well—meaning partner intent on bringing about a satisfactory resolution. The Russians are not sincere in this. In fact, they are hardly sincere about anything these days. Worryingly, their shenanigans are becoming increasingly reminiscent of their Soviet predecessors.

Vasko Kohlmayer   1 19 06

Thomas Lifson adds:

I think it is fine for those of us in the blogosphere to call 'em as we see them, but I am not certain that it is always a good idea to speak bluntly in diplomatic relations. I am not certain it is the right time to move diplomatic relations to a more openly hostile basis. I simply don't know all the secret stuff that is at stake.

There's a lot I don't know about the current realpolitik. I agree that the Russians increasingly are moving to a hostile posture. I have no doubt Sec. Rice is well—aware of this and is working on getting our way.