Oprah at Auschwitz

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Noted and prolific, New York—bred and now long—time Israel resident, author Naomi Ragen is commenting on Oprah Winfrey's forthcoming trip to Auschwitz. Oprah will be in the company of noted author and Nobel Peace Prize winner* Elie Wiesel.

Let me say this. While it is commendable that Oprah has discovered the Holocaust and is now going to introduce this subject to millions of Americans, I personally am a little tired of people crying over Auschwitz, when the survivors of the Holocaust, and their children and grandchildren are being targeted in Israel by Hitler's successors, Muslim
terrorists.  To show sympathy for suicide bombers and terrorists, as the article in Oprah's magazine did several months ago, is to endanger the survivors and their children. It's easy to feel sorry for dead Jews.  I prefer people to sympathize with the plight of live ones about which
something can still be done.

She's right.  Although the astute Elie Wiesel may have reached an agreement with Oprah Winfrey not to equate Auschwitz with terrorist bombers and their cause certainly the equally astute Winfrey might just gush a few words in that direction.
 
And as for Lasky's optimistic hope that as a result of the public exposure

"Oprah and Elie Wiesel will have done more to advance the cause of peace and the prevention of genocide than all the journalists at The Nation, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times will ever do in their lives"

that, as well, is not to be. 
 
Anti—Israeli forces are sure to pounce and twist, distortedly claiming that yeah sure, this was terrible, awful but it occurred in Europe by Europeans; why should we endure Jews in our midst grabbing our land, causing our people to suffer? Iran's not—so—wacky president has publicly stated this warped reasoning along with his equally warped suggestions on remedying  his version of  grievances.
 
So travel to Auschwitz Oprah.  And bring some faith and hope to your viewers and fans. 
 
But let's not read too much into her trip.

*as Ed Lasky noted, "when winning such a prize actually conferred some measure of legitimacy"

Ethel C. Fenig   1 24 06

Noted and prolific, New York—bred and now long—time Israel resident, author Naomi Ragen is commenting on Oprah Winfrey's forthcoming trip to Auschwitz. Oprah will be in the company of noted author and Nobel Peace Prize winner* Elie Wiesel.

Let me say this. While it is commendable that Oprah has discovered the Holocaust and is now going to introduce this subject to millions of Americans, I personally am a little tired of people crying over Auschwitz, when the survivors of the Holocaust, and their children and grandchildren are being targeted in Israel by Hitler's successors, Muslim
terrorists.  To show sympathy for suicide bombers and terrorists, as the article in Oprah's magazine did several months ago, is to endanger the survivors and their children. It's easy to feel sorry for dead Jews.  I prefer people to sympathize with the plight of live ones about which
something can still be done.

She's right.  Although the astute Elie Wiesel may have reached an agreement with Oprah Winfrey not to equate Auschwitz with terrorist bombers and their cause certainly the equally astute Winfrey might just gush a few words in that direction.
 
And as for Lasky's optimistic hope that as a result of the public exposure

"Oprah and Elie Wiesel will have done more to advance the cause of peace and the prevention of genocide than all the journalists at The Nation, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times will ever do in their lives"

that, as well, is not to be. 
 
Anti—Israeli forces are sure to pounce and twist, distortedly claiming that yeah sure, this was terrible, awful but it occurred in Europe by Europeans; why should we endure Jews in our midst grabbing our land, causing our people to suffer? Iran's not—so—wacky president has publicly stated this warped reasoning along with his equally warped suggestions on remedying  his version of  grievances.
 
So travel to Auschwitz Oprah.  And bring some faith and hope to your viewers and fans. 
 
But let's not read too much into her trip.

*as Ed Lasky noted, "when winning such a prize actually conferred some measure of legitimacy"

Ethel C. Fenig   1 24 06