Educrats define hypocrisy

By

The New York Times reports on a trend among states of mandating that 65% of school budgets be spent on classroom teaching, as opposed to educational bureaucracies, as a way to boost student educations. This would provide up to 14 billion dollars of INCREASED spending for our students in Americ. This would be enough, to quote an expert, "for a new computer for every student in the country, or 300,000 new teachers."

Needless to say, this proposal is adamantly opposed by the educrats—who seemingly care  more for their  own sinecures and perks (and far—left causes $link) than for  the students in their care.

How contorted can the logic be when educators try to defend their privilieges? They have spent  decades calling for increased educational spending. Now, when their discretion over funding and control of the money is threatened, Anne Bryant, the executive director of the National School Boards Association makes this hypocritical statement,

"... there is no evidence that spending 65 percent of your budget on classroom spending will produce higher academic achievement."

Get that, spending more money on students will not enhance their education. Recall that statement every time the teacher unions call for a boost in taxes to pay for more school funding.

Ed Lasky  1 04 06

UPDATE:

Reader J.D. Dantone from Austin, TX writes:

In 2005 the State of Texas required the local schools to spend 65% on classroom teaching and the reaction was as expected. Not being an educator, or administrator as they like to be called, this seemed to be a rather simple exercise to carryout. The educators are having a problem with this however, which speaks volumes to me about their competencies.

An article was recently published in the Austin Statesman—American about this. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is dealing with this issue. So far, football and band have been considered classroom subjects, to be counted in the 65% requirement. School libraries and librarians are not.

Even with Texas being high school football crazy, this is crazy.

The New York Times reports on a trend among states of mandating that 65% of school budgets be spent on classroom teaching, as opposed to educational bureaucracies, as a way to boost student educations. This would provide up to 14 billion dollars of INCREASED spending for our students in Americ. This would be enough, to quote an expert, "for a new computer for every student in the country, or 300,000 new teachers."

Needless to say, this proposal is adamantly opposed by the educrats—who seemingly care  more for their  own sinecures and perks (and far—left causes $link) than for  the students in their care.

How contorted can the logic be when educators try to defend their privilieges? They have spent  decades calling for increased educational spending. Now, when their discretion over funding and control of the money is threatened, Anne Bryant, the executive director of the National School Boards Association makes this hypocritical statement,

"... there is no evidence that spending 65 percent of your budget on classroom spending will produce higher academic achievement."

Get that, spending more money on students will not enhance their education. Recall that statement every time the teacher unions call for a boost in taxes to pay for more school funding.

Ed Lasky  1 04 06

UPDATE:

Reader J.D. Dantone from Austin, TX writes:

In 2005 the State of Texas required the local schools to spend 65% on classroom teaching and the reaction was as expected. Not being an educator, or administrator as they like to be called, this seemed to be a rather simple exercise to carryout. The educators are having a problem with this however, which speaks volumes to me about their competencies.

An article was recently published in the Austin Statesman—American about this. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is dealing with this issue. So far, football and band have been considered classroom subjects, to be counted in the 65% requirement. School libraries and librarians are not.

Even with Texas being high school football crazy, this is crazy.