CENTCOM Reports 16 January 2006

The CENTCOM Newsletter for the week of 9 January 2006 can be found here. Among the stories covered this week:

Amran, Yemen — If two—year—old Ebtisam Salim could have talked, she would have complained of having had diarrhea and a fever for almost two weeks.  But she was nearly unconscious when she arrived at the Sahab Clinic in Bani Mamoon, here, suffering from extreme hydration and a temperature of 103.2.  Salim was just one of hundreds of people who received medical treatment during a Combined Joint Task Force — Horn of Africa Medical Civil Action Plan event in Amran, an area of Yemen just north of Sana'a.  During the MedCAP, doctors and civil affairs team medics from CJTF—HOA teamed up with local practitioners and Yemeni Ministry of Health officials to offer free treatment and prescriptions at clinics in Bani Mamoon, Thula and Hababa.

Mosul Iraq — After years of tyranny and war, the children of Iraq have almost nothing and are very grateful for each gift they receive.  Lana Aziz, an Iraqi citizen and junior engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), coordinates the collection and distribution of shoes and school supplies for Iraqi children.  Through her childhood, Aziz watched as American organizations sent clothing and items to local churches in her community.  She watched as the goods were distributed and noticed some didn't make it to the families that needed it the most. Dismayed at the lack of support for American generosity and the misdirection of goods, Aziz decided if she could, she would do something about it.  While on assignment in the local villages, she noticed the children lacked proper shoes for the cold environment. This gave her the idea to collect shoes for the needy and make sure they were distributed to those who truly needed them.

Kabul , Afghanistan — The Afghan National Army met another milestone recently when 19 soldiers graduated from the Medium Tactical Vehicle familiarization course held at the German Maintenance Facility.  The graduation was an important step for the ANA because they recently received 374 vehicles through a contract with International Trucks, formally known as International Harvester.  The ANA will use the trucks to transport fuel, water and personnel throughout the country.

CENTCOM also reports that Iraqi Security forces are taking more of the primary role in operations in Iraq.

Iraqi Security Forces: Increasingly in the Lead by Staff Sgt. David Green

Iraqi Security Forces now number more than 223,000 trained and equipped soldiers and police. These troops are spread throughout the country and are taking an ever increasing roll in securing their country against terrorist and insurgents in areas across the country.

'As Iraqi security forces continue to grow in capability and size —— now numbering more than 223,000 —— they are conducting more and more successful independent operations throughout Iraq, including Baghdad,' Brig. Gen. Donald Alston, spokesman for Multi—National Force — Iraq, told reporters last week.

Brig. Gen. Alston added that these were wide ranging forces, some capable of conducting independent operations.

'There are now 120 Iraqi army and special operations battalions conducting combat operations against the enemy, 40 of which are assessed as being in the lead in defending Iraq, protecting progress and the process of democracy,' he said.

Compiled by Doug Hanson   1 16 06

The CENTCOM Newsletter for the week of 9 January 2006 can be found here. Among the stories covered this week:

Amran, Yemen — If two—year—old Ebtisam Salim could have talked, she would have complained of having had diarrhea and a fever for almost two weeks.  But she was nearly unconscious when she arrived at the Sahab Clinic in Bani Mamoon, here, suffering from extreme hydration and a temperature of 103.2.  Salim was just one of hundreds of people who received medical treatment during a Combined Joint Task Force — Horn of Africa Medical Civil Action Plan event in Amran, an area of Yemen just north of Sana'a.  During the MedCAP, doctors and civil affairs team medics from CJTF—HOA teamed up with local practitioners and Yemeni Ministry of Health officials to offer free treatment and prescriptions at clinics in Bani Mamoon, Thula and Hababa.

Mosul Iraq — After years of tyranny and war, the children of Iraq have almost nothing and are very grateful for each gift they receive.  Lana Aziz, an Iraqi citizen and junior engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), coordinates the collection and distribution of shoes and school supplies for Iraqi children.  Through her childhood, Aziz watched as American organizations sent clothing and items to local churches in her community.  She watched as the goods were distributed and noticed some didn't make it to the families that needed it the most. Dismayed at the lack of support for American generosity and the misdirection of goods, Aziz decided if she could, she would do something about it.  While on assignment in the local villages, she noticed the children lacked proper shoes for the cold environment. This gave her the idea to collect shoes for the needy and make sure they were distributed to those who truly needed them.

Kabul , Afghanistan — The Afghan National Army met another milestone recently when 19 soldiers graduated from the Medium Tactical Vehicle familiarization course held at the German Maintenance Facility.  The graduation was an important step for the ANA because they recently received 374 vehicles through a contract with International Trucks, formally known as International Harvester.  The ANA will use the trucks to transport fuel, water and personnel throughout the country.

CENTCOM also reports that Iraqi Security forces are taking more of the primary role in operations in Iraq.

Iraqi Security Forces: Increasingly in the Lead by Staff Sgt. David Green

Iraqi Security Forces now number more than 223,000 trained and equipped soldiers and police. These troops are spread throughout the country and are taking an ever increasing roll in securing their country against terrorist and insurgents in areas across the country.

'As Iraqi security forces continue to grow in capability and size —— now numbering more than 223,000 —— they are conducting more and more successful independent operations throughout Iraq, including Baghdad,' Brig. Gen. Donald Alston, spokesman for Multi—National Force — Iraq, told reporters last week.

Brig. Gen. Alston added that these were wide ranging forces, some capable of conducting independent operations.

'There are now 120 Iraqi army and special operations battalions conducting combat operations against the enemy, 40 of which are assessed as being in the lead in defending Iraq, protecting progress and the process of democracy,' he said.

Compiled by Doug Hanson   1 16 06