Cash rewards

There's no other incentive quite like the prospect of a large sum of cash. Police departments, bail bondsmen, and worried parents use cash rewards to good effect. They may cost a lot, but they work.

Israpundit has discovered the delightful fact that a government—funded program already exists with a fascinating potential incentive:

To members of the the Palestine Solidarity Movement and its affiliated organizations, especially the 501(c)(3) tax—exempt ones; this money—making scheme is not only legal, it is approved (and operated) by the U.S. Government. If you're a disgruntled employee of one of these organizations or you just need some extra cash, and you know something that the organization has forgotten to tell the Internal Revenue Service, you can earn a reward by reporting it.

You don't even need to be an employee to have potential knowledge of a tax law violation. Suppose, for example, one of these organizations funds your trip to Israel to engage in "direct action" or interfere with Israeli security operations. I am not a lawyer (tax or otherwise) and none of the following constitutes legal advice or a professional opinion of the tax deductibility of the actions described but it is hard to see how an expenditure of this nature could qualify as tax—exempt. The Internal Revenue Service says, in fact, that organizations that plan and carry out activities "contrary to public policy," a category that includes domestic civil disobedience, cannot be tax exempt. It is unknown whether this extends to sponsorship of civil disobedience abroad.

Rev Rule 75—384,J, "Activities that are Illegal or Contrary to Public Policy" says in part,

...The purpose is illegal ...if the trust tends to induce the commission of crime or if the accomplishment of the purpose is otherwise against public policy....

 the planning and sponsoring of such activities are also incompatible with charity and social welfare.Rev.Rul.75—384 holds that an organization formed to promote world peace that planned and sponsored protest demonstrations at which members were urged to commit acts of civil disobedience did not qualify for IRC 501(c)(3) or (4) exemption.

Ed Lasky  1 27 06

UPDATE: Sweetness & Light pulls together all the information you need to get the ball rolling, should you care to collect a reward. The picture used to illustrate the article alone is worth the click over.

There's no other incentive quite like the prospect of a large sum of cash. Police departments, bail bondsmen, and worried parents use cash rewards to good effect. They may cost a lot, but they work.

Israpundit has discovered the delightful fact that a government—funded program already exists with a fascinating potential incentive:

To members of the the Palestine Solidarity Movement and its affiliated organizations, especially the 501(c)(3) tax—exempt ones; this money—making scheme is not only legal, it is approved (and operated) by the U.S. Government. If you're a disgruntled employee of one of these organizations or you just need some extra cash, and you know something that the organization has forgotten to tell the Internal Revenue Service, you can earn a reward by reporting it.

You don't even need to be an employee to have potential knowledge of a tax law violation. Suppose, for example, one of these organizations funds your trip to Israel to engage in "direct action" or interfere with Israeli security operations. I am not a lawyer (tax or otherwise) and none of the following constitutes legal advice or a professional opinion of the tax deductibility of the actions described but it is hard to see how an expenditure of this nature could qualify as tax—exempt. The Internal Revenue Service says, in fact, that organizations that plan and carry out activities "contrary to public policy," a category that includes domestic civil disobedience, cannot be tax exempt. It is unknown whether this extends to sponsorship of civil disobedience abroad.

Rev Rule 75—384,J, "Activities that are Illegal or Contrary to Public Policy" says in part,

...The purpose is illegal ...if the trust tends to induce the commission of crime or if the accomplishment of the purpose is otherwise against public policy....

 the planning and sponsoring of such activities are also incompatible with charity and social welfare.Rev.Rul.75—384 holds that an organization formed to promote world peace that planned and sponsored protest demonstrations at which members were urged to commit acts of civil disobedience did not qualify for IRC 501(c)(3) or (4) exemption.

Ed Lasky  1 27 06

UPDATE: Sweetness & Light pulls together all the information you need to get the ball rolling, should you care to collect a reward. The picture used to illustrate the article alone is worth the click over.