Buy Danish! to counter the Islamic boycott (updated!)

By

Several months ago an international boycott was launched against Israel by educational unions in the UK. Leftist churches have passed anti—Israel investment policies. For some reason political boycotts always come from the Left, and they are always one—sided.

Now Denmark is the target. It's the "cartoon crisis!"  After the newspaper Jyllands Posten  published satirical cartoons featuring Mohammed, the Islamic world has been building up a head of steam.  How could the Danes laugh at the Prophet, and worse, publish drawings of Allah's ultimate representative on earth? Pictorial depictions of the human figure are a big taboo; pictures of Mohammed are even worse; and satirical cartoons of Mohammed are the ueber—ueber—taboo to the fundamentalists.

The Prime Minister of Denmark, Fogh Rasmussen, has given a simple answer.

"Freedom of expression is deeply ingrained in a society where democracy prevails."

So there.

Now the Saudis and Libyans have recalled their ambassadors to Copenhagen, and the Yemen Parliament has condemned the "cartoon outrage."

"BAHRAIN'S parliament will meet in an extraordinary session today as outrage grows over offensive caricatures depicting Prophet Mohammed, published in Denmark and Norway. MPs have urged a nationwide boycott of Danish and Norwegian products, until the countries apologise."

The Jyllands Posten now has a 24 hour police guard on its building. Needless to say, the Danes (and later the Norwegians) have apologized for offending Muslims. But apologies won't be enough ——— those countries have to guarantee it will never happen again.

"... the harm has been done and our religion has been insulted. What guarantees do we have that this won't happen again? An apology from the editor—in—chief isn't enough, we want it from the demonic person who drew them."

Get this — the fundamentalist Muslim world is determined to extend religious censorship over foreign countries. And it won't stop there.

If the boycott works against little Denmark, it will be used again and again. Arabic countries have plenty of oil money for buying and boycotting products. China just got Google to censor its internet users — why wouldn't the Muslim world do the same thing? They are bound to try.

It's worth remembering that Islamic fundamentalists have been publishing an endless stream of Nazi—style hate cartoons against Israel and the United States. But that's OK. Killing people is good, if they are infidels and condemned by Allah. Drawing satirical cartoons of Mohammed will get you a death warrant.

So for those who believe in free speech, you might consider joining the counter—boycott: Buy Danish!

And tell the world if you love Havarti cheese, Lego toys, Georg Jensen designs, Tuborg and Carlsberg beer, Danish ham, and free cartooning.

Remember that Denmark was the only Nazi—occuppied European country that came out of World War Two with its moral reputation intact. The Danes just didn't put up with Jews being sent to concentration camps. They smuggled them out to neutral Sweden.

Maybe Denmark will have the honor of being the first European country to stand against today's Islamic fascism.

Two sides can play at this boycott game. Buy Danish!

UPDATE:

Richard Baehr writes:

Hamas began a new charm offensive today, by threatening Danes and Norwegians who visit Gaza. Free speech or free exercise of religion (say not be to be an Islamic fundamentalist) are not part of what free elections have brought to the Palestinian territories.

Hamas means to deny free speech elsewhere, not just in their own rump state. Kind of like fatwahs against Salmon rushdie and the murdering Van Gogh. Hamas would obviously approve, having a thuggish record of its own.

Hamas may be the gift that keeps on giving for Israel, as Europeans get a taste of Hamas' operating style.

EDITOR'S NOTE:

Readers have written wanting to see the cartoons. For obvious reasons nobody wants to publish them. But I the very first search engine I chose led to me a slow—loading site where I saw them.

BREAKING NEWS UPDATE:

Bill Clinton has just denounced the cartoons:

Clinton described as "appalling" the 12 cartoons published in a Danish newspaper in September depicting Prophet Mohammed and causing uproar in the Muslim world.

"None of us are totally free of stereotypes about people of different races, different ethnic groups, and different religions ... there was this appalling example in northern Europe, in Denmark ... these totally outrageous cartoons against Islam," he said.

The cartoons, including a portrayal of the prophet wearing a time—bomb—shaped turban, were reprinted in a Norwegian magazine in January, sparking uproar in the Muslim world where images of the prophet are considered blasphemous.

Clinton criticised the tendency to generalise negative news of Islamic militancy.

DENMARK UPDATE:

The Editor—in—Chief of Jyllands Posten points out that various cartoons have been attributed to his newspaper that never appeared there, and explains the entire project:

Honourable Fellow Citizens of the Muslim World

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten is a strong proponent of democracy and freedom of religion. The newspaper respects the right of any human being to practise his or her religion. Serious misunderstandings in respect of some drawings of the Prophet Mohammed have led to much anger and, lately, also boycott of Danish goods in Muslim countries.

Please allow me to correct these misunderstandings.

On 30 September last year, Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten published 12 different cartoonists' idea of what the Prophet Mohammed might have looked like. The initiative was taken as part of an ongoing public debate on freedom of expression, a freedom much cherished in Denmark.

In our opinion, the 12 drawings were sober. They were not intended to be offensive, nor were they at variance with Danish law, but they have indisputably offended many Muslims for which we apologize.

Since then a number of offensive drawings have circulated in The Middle East which have never been published in Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten and which we would never have published, had they been offered to us. We would have refused to publish them on the grounds that they violated our ethical code.

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten attaches importance to upholding the highest ethical standards based upon the respect of our fundamental values. It is so much more deplorable, therefore, that these drawings were presented as if they had anything to do with Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten.

Maybe because of culturally based misunderstandings, the initiative to publish the 12 drawings has been interpreted as a campaign against Muslims in Denmark and the rest of the world.

I must categorically dismiss such an interpretation. Because of the very fact that we are strong proponents of the freedom of religion and because we respect the right of any human being to practise his or her religion, offending anybody on the grounds of their religious beliefs is unthinkable to us.

That this happened was, consequently, unintentional.

As a result of the debate that has been going on about the drawings, we have met with representatives of Danish Muslims, and these meetings were held in a positive and constructive spirit. We have also sought in other ways to initiate a fruitful dialogue with Danish Muslims.

It is the wish of Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten that various ethnic groups should live in peace and harmony with each other and that the debates and disagreements which will always exist in a dynamic society should do so in an atmosphere of mutual respect.

For that reason, Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten has published many articles describing the positive aspects of integration, for example in a special supplement entitled The Contributors. It portrayed a number of Muslims who have had success in Denmark. The supplement was rewarded by the EU Commission.

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten takes exception to symbolic acts suited to demonise specific nationalities, religions and ethnic groups.

Sincerely yours

Carsten Juste
Editor—in—Chief

Several months ago an international boycott was launched against Israel by educational unions in the UK. Leftist churches have passed anti—Israel investment policies. For some reason political boycotts always come from the Left, and they are always one—sided.

Now Denmark is the target. It's the "cartoon crisis!"  After the newspaper Jyllands Posten  published satirical cartoons featuring Mohammed, the Islamic world has been building up a head of steam.  How could the Danes laugh at the Prophet, and worse, publish drawings of Allah's ultimate representative on earth? Pictorial depictions of the human figure are a big taboo; pictures of Mohammed are even worse; and satirical cartoons of Mohammed are the ueber—ueber—taboo to the fundamentalists.

The Prime Minister of Denmark, Fogh Rasmussen, has given a simple answer.

"Freedom of expression is deeply ingrained in a society where democracy prevails."

So there.

Now the Saudis and Libyans have recalled their ambassadors to Copenhagen, and the Yemen Parliament has condemned the "cartoon outrage."

"BAHRAIN'S parliament will meet in an extraordinary session today as outrage grows over offensive caricatures depicting Prophet Mohammed, published in Denmark and Norway. MPs have urged a nationwide boycott of Danish and Norwegian products, until the countries apologise."

The Jyllands Posten now has a 24 hour police guard on its building. Needless to say, the Danes (and later the Norwegians) have apologized for offending Muslims. But apologies won't be enough ——— those countries have to guarantee it will never happen again.

"... the harm has been done and our religion has been insulted. What guarantees do we have that this won't happen again? An apology from the editor—in—chief isn't enough, we want it from the demonic person who drew them."

Get this — the fundamentalist Muslim world is determined to extend religious censorship over foreign countries. And it won't stop there.

If the boycott works against little Denmark, it will be used again and again. Arabic countries have plenty of oil money for buying and boycotting products. China just got Google to censor its internet users — why wouldn't the Muslim world do the same thing? They are bound to try.

It's worth remembering that Islamic fundamentalists have been publishing an endless stream of Nazi—style hate cartoons against Israel and the United States. But that's OK. Killing people is good, if they are infidels and condemned by Allah. Drawing satirical cartoons of Mohammed will get you a death warrant.

So for those who believe in free speech, you might consider joining the counter—boycott: Buy Danish!

And tell the world if you love Havarti cheese, Lego toys, Georg Jensen designs, Tuborg and Carlsberg beer, Danish ham, and free cartooning.

Remember that Denmark was the only Nazi—occuppied European country that came out of World War Two with its moral reputation intact. The Danes just didn't put up with Jews being sent to concentration camps. They smuggled them out to neutral Sweden.

Maybe Denmark will have the honor of being the first European country to stand against today's Islamic fascism.

Two sides can play at this boycott game. Buy Danish!

UPDATE:

Richard Baehr writes:

Hamas began a new charm offensive today, by threatening Danes and Norwegians who visit Gaza. Free speech or free exercise of religion (say not be to be an Islamic fundamentalist) are not part of what free elections have brought to the Palestinian territories.

Hamas means to deny free speech elsewhere, not just in their own rump state. Kind of like fatwahs against Salmon rushdie and the murdering Van Gogh. Hamas would obviously approve, having a thuggish record of its own.

Hamas may be the gift that keeps on giving for Israel, as Europeans get a taste of Hamas' operating style.

EDITOR'S NOTE:

Readers have written wanting to see the cartoons. For obvious reasons nobody wants to publish them. But I the very first search engine I chose led to me a slow—loading site where I saw them.

BREAKING NEWS UPDATE:

Bill Clinton has just denounced the cartoons:

Clinton described as "appalling" the 12 cartoons published in a Danish newspaper in September depicting Prophet Mohammed and causing uproar in the Muslim world.

"None of us are totally free of stereotypes about people of different races, different ethnic groups, and different religions ... there was this appalling example in northern Europe, in Denmark ... these totally outrageous cartoons against Islam," he said.

The cartoons, including a portrayal of the prophet wearing a time—bomb—shaped turban, were reprinted in a Norwegian magazine in January, sparking uproar in the Muslim world where images of the prophet are considered blasphemous.

Clinton criticised the tendency to generalise negative news of Islamic militancy.

DENMARK UPDATE:

The Editor—in—Chief of Jyllands Posten points out that various cartoons have been attributed to his newspaper that never appeared there, and explains the entire project:

Honourable Fellow Citizens of the Muslim World

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten is a strong proponent of democracy and freedom of religion. The newspaper respects the right of any human being to practise his or her religion. Serious misunderstandings in respect of some drawings of the Prophet Mohammed have led to much anger and, lately, also boycott of Danish goods in Muslim countries.

Please allow me to correct these misunderstandings.

On 30 September last year, Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten published 12 different cartoonists' idea of what the Prophet Mohammed might have looked like. The initiative was taken as part of an ongoing public debate on freedom of expression, a freedom much cherished in Denmark.

In our opinion, the 12 drawings were sober. They were not intended to be offensive, nor were they at variance with Danish law, but they have indisputably offended many Muslims for which we apologize.

Since then a number of offensive drawings have circulated in The Middle East which have never been published in Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten and which we would never have published, had they been offered to us. We would have refused to publish them on the grounds that they violated our ethical code.

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten attaches importance to upholding the highest ethical standards based upon the respect of our fundamental values. It is so much more deplorable, therefore, that these drawings were presented as if they had anything to do with Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten.

Maybe because of culturally based misunderstandings, the initiative to publish the 12 drawings has been interpreted as a campaign against Muslims in Denmark and the rest of the world.

I must categorically dismiss such an interpretation. Because of the very fact that we are strong proponents of the freedom of religion and because we respect the right of any human being to practise his or her religion, offending anybody on the grounds of their religious beliefs is unthinkable to us.

That this happened was, consequently, unintentional.

As a result of the debate that has been going on about the drawings, we have met with representatives of Danish Muslims, and these meetings were held in a positive and constructive spirit. We have also sought in other ways to initiate a fruitful dialogue with Danish Muslims.

It is the wish of Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten that various ethnic groups should live in peace and harmony with each other and that the debates and disagreements which will always exist in a dynamic society should do so in an atmosphere of mutual respect.

For that reason, Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten has published many articles describing the positive aspects of integration, for example in a special supplement entitled The Contributors. It portrayed a number of Muslims who have had success in Denmark. The supplement was rewarded by the EU Commission.

Morgenavisen Jyllands—Posten takes exception to symbolic acts suited to demonise specific nationalities, religions and ethnic groups.

Sincerely yours

Carsten Juste
Editor—in—Chief