The New York Times Intelligence Scandal

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The New York Times and the Democrat Left (the overlap is considerable) have gone into water that may be deeper than they suspect, with the printing of a year—old story based on intelligence leaks, on the very day the Senate voted on cloture for renewing the USA Patriot Act. Democrats are now on the hook for weakening our ability to prevent another 9/11. We hope and trust this failure will be rectified quickly.

Congressional leaders of both parties were informed of the program approved by the President to monitor telephone calls between US citizens and foreigners, so the program wasn't exactly "secret". But the Times' spin on the story was otherwise. There will be ample time for further examination of the facts, and the President is showing that he means business, by altering his recorded radio address in favor of a live TV/radio address ont he subject of national security being damaged.

Now that the Plame case has established that leaking secrets from the CIA is a crime, and that reporters may be jailed if they refuse to give up their sources, some chickens may well be coming home to roost. It is far too soon for AT to lay out where we think this case may be going, but we think the President's skill as a poker player, one who knows how to encourage his opponents to bet on a losing hand, is at work once again. 

People who pay attention to media spin may think the President is in trouble. We don't. The fat lady isn't even to close to singing the finale of this case. Stay tuned.

Thomas Lifson   12 18 05

The New York Times and the Democrat Left (the overlap is considerable) have gone into water that may be deeper than they suspect, with the printing of a year—old story based on intelligence leaks, on the very day the Senate voted on cloture for renewing the USA Patriot Act. Democrats are now on the hook for weakening our ability to prevent another 9/11. We hope and trust this failure will be rectified quickly.

Congressional leaders of both parties were informed of the program approved by the President to monitor telephone calls between US citizens and foreigners, so the program wasn't exactly "secret". But the Times' spin on the story was otherwise. There will be ample time for further examination of the facts, and the President is showing that he means business, by altering his recorded radio address in favor of a live TV/radio address ont he subject of national security being damaged.

Now that the Plame case has established that leaking secrets from the CIA is a crime, and that reporters may be jailed if they refuse to give up their sources, some chickens may well be coming home to roost. It is far too soon for AT to lay out where we think this case may be going, but we think the President's skill as a poker player, one who knows how to encourage his opponents to bet on a losing hand, is at work once again. 

People who pay attention to media spin may think the President is in trouble. We don't. The fat lady isn't even to close to singing the finale of this case. Stay tuned.

Thomas Lifson   12 18 05