The Big Lie

Why does Tom Daschle have to follow up Ted Kennedy with another Big Lie? Again, repeat after me, Presidents Clinton and Carter approved these sorts of investigations; Clinton's Assistant Attorney General wrote an op—ed in the Chicago Tribune showing their legality, and "controlling legal authority.".

Ed Lasky  12 23 05

Clarice Feldman adds:

Ex—Senator Tom Daschle, now a senior fellow at the Soros—funded Center for American Progress (CAP),weighs in on the NSA kerfuffle, indicating that even right after 9/11, Senate Democrats tried to tie the President's hands at preventing terrorist attacks:

On the evening of Sept. 12, 2001, the White House proposed that Congress authorize the use of military force to "deter and pre—empt any future acts of terrorism or aggression against the United States." Believing the scope of this language was too broad and ill defined, Congress chose instead, on Sept. 14, to authorize "all necessary and appropriate force against those nations, organizations or persons [the president] determines planned, authorized, committed or aided" the attacks of Sept. 11. With this language, Congress denied the president the more expansive authority he sought and insisted that his authority be used specifically against Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda.

Just before the Senate acted on this compromise resolution, the White House sought one last change. Literally minutes before the Senate cast its vote, the administration sought to add the words "in the United States and" after "appropriate force" in the agreed—upon text. This last—minute change would have given the president broad authority to exercise expansive powers not just overseas —— where we all understood he wanted authority to act —— but right here in the United States, potentially against American citizens. I could see no justification for Congress to accede to this extraordinary request for additional authority. I refused.

The shock and rage we all felt in the hours after the attack were still fresh. America was reeling from the first attack on our soil since Pearl Harbor. We suspected thousands had been killed, and many who worked in the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were not yet accounted for. Even so, a strong bipartisan majority could not agree to the administration's request for an unprecedented grant of authority.

Even before this extraordinary and late in the game assertion, Rasmussen indicates the President's approval rating has shot up to fifty percent.

A few more statements like Daschle's and there'll be a groundswell to repeal the Twenty—second Amendment.For he makes it crystal clear that the only peril the Democrats will acknowledge is their loss of power, not the threat to the national security. And we can see how far they are willing to jeopardize our welfare to regain their waning fortunes.

Why does Tom Daschle have to follow up Ted Kennedy with another Big Lie? Again, repeat after me, Presidents Clinton and Carter approved these sorts of investigations; Clinton's Assistant Attorney General wrote an op—ed in the Chicago Tribune showing their legality, and "controlling legal authority.".

Ed Lasky  12 23 05

Clarice Feldman adds:

Ex—Senator Tom Daschle, now a senior fellow at the Soros—funded Center for American Progress (CAP),weighs in on the NSA kerfuffle, indicating that even right after 9/11, Senate Democrats tried to tie the President's hands at preventing terrorist attacks:

On the evening of Sept. 12, 2001, the White House proposed that Congress authorize the use of military force to "deter and pre—empt any future acts of terrorism or aggression against the United States." Believing the scope of this language was too broad and ill defined, Congress chose instead, on Sept. 14, to authorize "all necessary and appropriate force against those nations, organizations or persons [the president] determines planned, authorized, committed or aided" the attacks of Sept. 11. With this language, Congress denied the president the more expansive authority he sought and insisted that his authority be used specifically against Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda.

Just before the Senate acted on this compromise resolution, the White House sought one last change. Literally minutes before the Senate cast its vote, the administration sought to add the words "in the United States and" after "appropriate force" in the agreed—upon text. This last—minute change would have given the president broad authority to exercise expansive powers not just overseas —— where we all understood he wanted authority to act —— but right here in the United States, potentially against American citizens. I could see no justification for Congress to accede to this extraordinary request for additional authority. I refused.

The shock and rage we all felt in the hours after the attack were still fresh. America was reeling from the first attack on our soil since Pearl Harbor. We suspected thousands had been killed, and many who worked in the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were not yet accounted for. Even so, a strong bipartisan majority could not agree to the administration's request for an unprecedented grant of authority.

Even before this extraordinary and late in the game assertion, Rasmussen indicates the President's approval rating has shot up to fifty percent.

A few more statements like Daschle's and there'll be a groundswell to repeal the Twenty—second Amendment.For he makes it crystal clear that the only peril the Democrats will acknowledge is their loss of power, not the threat to the national security. And we can see how far they are willing to jeopardize our welfare to regain their waning fortunes.