Persecution of Rush Limbaugh suffers a blow

When the political history of this era is written by observers detached from current passions, there is no doubt that Rush Limbaugh will accorded a prominent place in explaining the rise of conservatism. He is without question the single most influential media figure in the entire history of American broadcasting.

When the history of Rush Limbaugh is examined by objective historians of the future, the shameful persecution he has endured will no doubt the subject of many a doctoral dissertation. Many of them will focus on the shameful persecution he has endured at the hands of a partisan prosecutor.

How was it possible that such an important figure could be the only person ever prosecuted in Florida for the specific behavior alleged? And how was it possible that he uniquely was subjected to an attempted violation of doctor—patient confidentiality?

At last, a sensible ruling has been issued which recognizes that Rush Limbaugh, no less than any other American, is entitled to have his doctor—patient relationship unmolested by the questions of prosecutors directed at his physician, in search of an offense on which to indict him. Judge David Crow prohibited prosecutors from asking Rush's doctors about his medical treatment and condition or information he shared with his doctors during his care and treatment.

The fact is that we know that Rush Limbaugh developed a dependency on prescription painkillers, and that he eventually obtained some without benefit of prescription. This is neither healthy nor legal, and I do not endorse such behavior. But in  the wake of excruciating pain from a medical condition, and under pressure to continue to captivate a huge radio audience while losing his hearing, it is a rather understandable transgression.

When other well—known people have developed presciption drug dependencies, they have been smothered in support. Betty Ford has a clinic named after her. But Rush Limbaugh, and Rush Limbaugh alone, has been pursued by an obsessed political enemy using his office as prosecutor to take out the most important conservative in the mass media.

Congratulations are due to Rush and to his lawyer Roy Black. It is time for the persecution of Rush to end. Now that the prosecutorial fishing expedition has been ruled out of bounds, the DA should pursue real criminals who harm the public.

Thomas Lifson  12 12 05

When the political history of this era is written by observers detached from current passions, there is no doubt that Rush Limbaugh will accorded a prominent place in explaining the rise of conservatism. He is without question the single most influential media figure in the entire history of American broadcasting.

When the history of Rush Limbaugh is examined by objective historians of the future, the shameful persecution he has endured will no doubt the subject of many a doctoral dissertation. Many of them will focus on the shameful persecution he has endured at the hands of a partisan prosecutor.

How was it possible that such an important figure could be the only person ever prosecuted in Florida for the specific behavior alleged? And how was it possible that he uniquely was subjected to an attempted violation of doctor—patient confidentiality?

At last, a sensible ruling has been issued which recognizes that Rush Limbaugh, no less than any other American, is entitled to have his doctor—patient relationship unmolested by the questions of prosecutors directed at his physician, in search of an offense on which to indict him. Judge David Crow prohibited prosecutors from asking Rush's doctors about his medical treatment and condition or information he shared with his doctors during his care and treatment.

The fact is that we know that Rush Limbaugh developed a dependency on prescription painkillers, and that he eventually obtained some without benefit of prescription. This is neither healthy nor legal, and I do not endorse such behavior. But in  the wake of excruciating pain from a medical condition, and under pressure to continue to captivate a huge radio audience while losing his hearing, it is a rather understandable transgression.

When other well—known people have developed presciption drug dependencies, they have been smothered in support. Betty Ford has a clinic named after her. But Rush Limbaugh, and Rush Limbaugh alone, has been pursued by an obsessed political enemy using his office as prosecutor to take out the most important conservative in the mass media.

Congratulations are due to Rush and to his lawyer Roy Black. It is time for the persecution of Rush to end. Now that the prosecutorial fishing expedition has been ruled out of bounds, the DA should pursue real criminals who harm the public.

Thomas Lifson  12 12 05