No favorable acrostics allowed

Education officials in Pakistan are removing from English textbooks a poem on leadership in the form of an acrostic — where the first letter of each line spells out "President George W. Bush." The Age of Melbourne reports:

The 20—line anonymous poem, The Leader, lists the qualities of "a man who will do what he must", and bears a passing resemblance to Rudyard Kipling's If.

"Ever assuring he'll stand by his word/Wanting the world to join his firm stand/Bracing for war, but praying for peace/Using his power so evil will cease," run typical lines.

An education spokesman said officials had no idea who wrote the poem, nor how it found its way into A Textbook of English for 16—year—olds last year. The acrostic is embarrassing for President Pervez Musharraf, who is already under fire at home for being allegedly pro—American and supporting the US war on terrorism.

Hat tip: Eric Schwappach

Thomas Lifson  12 05 05

Education officials in Pakistan are removing from English textbooks a poem on leadership in the form of an acrostic — where the first letter of each line spells out "President George W. Bush." The Age of Melbourne reports:

The 20—line anonymous poem, The Leader, lists the qualities of "a man who will do what he must", and bears a passing resemblance to Rudyard Kipling's If.

"Ever assuring he'll stand by his word/Wanting the world to join his firm stand/Bracing for war, but praying for peace/Using his power so evil will cease," run typical lines.

An education spokesman said officials had no idea who wrote the poem, nor how it found its way into A Textbook of English for 16—year—olds last year. The acrostic is embarrassing for President Pervez Musharraf, who is already under fire at home for being allegedly pro—American and supporting the US war on terrorism.

Hat tip: Eric Schwappach

Thomas Lifson  12 05 05