No ecumenical spirit in Bethlehem on Christmas

As  noted here a few days ago, for the past several years Muslim Arabs have terrorized Christian Arabs in Bethlehem to such an extent that most of the Christians have fled to save their lives.  As a result, Bethlehem's once dominant Christian majority has shriveled to an estimated 20% of the population.
 
The remaining Christian population there is led by Michel Sabah, a Christian Arab who is considered to be the Pope's representative in Israel. Tellingly, he is also a vocal opponent of Israel, known for criticizing Israel on all occasions.  This is also true of his extended influential family.
 
True to form, in his Christmas sermon in Bethlehem he loudly blasted Israel for the separation wall that has proven so effective in reducing (alas not eliminating) terrorist Arab killers of Israelis. 
 
Israel's most senior Roman Catholic leader has said Bethlehem has become an "immense prison" since the erection of the West Bank barrier.
 
Yes, he spoke about peace between peoples — all very nice — but ignoring the reasons for the barrier and not condemning Arab Moslem terror while solely blaming Israel not only negates his message but inspires Jewish wariness of Christian intentions. 
 
Is this the message the Pope wants to send?
 
Ethel C. Fenig   12 25 05
As  noted here a few days ago, for the past several years Muslim Arabs have terrorized Christian Arabs in Bethlehem to such an extent that most of the Christians have fled to save their lives.  As a result, Bethlehem's once dominant Christian majority has shriveled to an estimated 20% of the population.
 
The remaining Christian population there is led by Michel Sabah, a Christian Arab who is considered to be the Pope's representative in Israel. Tellingly, he is also a vocal opponent of Israel, known for criticizing Israel on all occasions.  This is also true of his extended influential family.
 
True to form, in his Christmas sermon in Bethlehem he loudly blasted Israel for the separation wall that has proven so effective in reducing (alas not eliminating) terrorist Arab killers of Israelis. 
 
Israel's most senior Roman Catholic leader has said Bethlehem has become an "immense prison" since the erection of the West Bank barrier.
 
Yes, he spoke about peace between peoples — all very nice — but ignoring the reasons for the barrier and not condemning Arab Moslem terror while solely blaming Israel not only negates his message but inspires Jewish wariness of Christian intentions. 
 
Is this the message the Pope wants to send?
 
Ethel C. Fenig   12 25 05