No blood on their hands?

The Washington Times reveals today that the Coalition effort to push the peace process with Iraq's so—called Sunni nationalists has also included a prisoner release deal.  Yesterday, the US freed eight high—value detainees from Saddam's former regime.  Publicly, the Coalition paints the Sunni outreach project as being fully aligned with the national security strategy in that only Sunni 'rejectionists' are targeted for inclusion in the Iraqi political progress.  However, it then became known that the high command had held secret talks  with hard—core Baathists and Saddam loyalists; i.e., those with 'blood on their hands.'

The pattern continues of dealing with the enemy and not only with Sunni nationalists.  Among the prisoners freed:

  •  Rihab Taha, aka "Dr. Germ" who has admitted to producing germ—warfare agents.

  •  Microbiologist Huda Ammash, aka "Mrs. Anthrax," who was interrogated extensively by U.S. weapons investigators.

  •  Hossam Mohammed Amin, a former senior Iraqi official who sparred with U.N. weapons inspectors.

  •  Aseel Tabra, who served as private secretary to Saddam's son Uday Hussein, who was killed in a raid by US forces in Mosul in 2003.

  • More than 16 other high—value detainees, most whose pictures appeared in the 'most wanted' card deck passed out to US troops during OIF, have already been released or will be shortly.  The US maintains they no longer pose a security threat.

    Iraqi government officials however, vowed to 'hunt down and recapture some of the detainees,' including those who were high ranking members of Saddam's government and security forces.  Iraqi National Security Adviser, Mowaffak al—Rubaie said that,

    "We will certainly claim them back, and we will follow them wherever they go.  The Iraqi judiciary will follow them."

    President Bush has done the right thing by staying the course in Iraq, and by establishing a conditions—based strategy instead of withdrawing troops on a pre—determined timetable.  Also, the Coalition has worked long and hard to ensure the new Iraqi government is legitimate and credible.  So why does the command in Baghdad feel the need to cut deals with Saddam loyalists?  What's the rush?

    Doug Hanson  12—20—05

    The Washington Times reveals today that the Coalition effort to push the peace process with Iraq's so—called Sunni nationalists has also included a prisoner release deal.  Yesterday, the US freed eight high—value detainees from Saddam's former regime.  Publicly, the Coalition paints the Sunni outreach project as being fully aligned with the national security strategy in that only Sunni 'rejectionists' are targeted for inclusion in the Iraqi political progress.  However, it then became known that the high command had held secret talks  with hard—core Baathists and Saddam loyalists; i.e., those with 'blood on their hands.'

    The pattern continues of dealing with the enemy and not only with Sunni nationalists.  Among the prisoners freed:

  •  Rihab Taha, aka "Dr. Germ" who has admitted to producing germ—warfare agents.

  •  Microbiologist Huda Ammash, aka "Mrs. Anthrax," who was interrogated extensively by U.S. weapons investigators.

  •  Hossam Mohammed Amin, a former senior Iraqi official who sparred with U.N. weapons inspectors.

  •  Aseel Tabra, who served as private secretary to Saddam's son Uday Hussein, who was killed in a raid by US forces in Mosul in 2003.

  • More than 16 other high—value detainees, most whose pictures appeared in the 'most wanted' card deck passed out to US troops during OIF, have already been released or will be shortly.  The US maintains they no longer pose a security threat.

    Iraqi government officials however, vowed to 'hunt down and recapture some of the detainees,' including those who were high ranking members of Saddam's government and security forces.  Iraqi National Security Adviser, Mowaffak al—Rubaie said that,

    "We will certainly claim them back, and we will follow them wherever they go.  The Iraqi judiciary will follow them."

    President Bush has done the right thing by staying the course in Iraq, and by establishing a conditions—based strategy instead of withdrawing troops on a pre—determined timetable.  Also, the Coalition has worked long and hard to ensure the new Iraqi government is legitimate and credible.  So why does the command in Baghdad feel the need to cut deals with Saddam loyalists?  What's the rush?

    Doug Hanson  12—20—05