Christmas is a waste of paper?

By

Ah, what would we do this XXXX Season without the jolly elves of PC?  Among the usual collection of religiophobic paranoid stories comes this gem from Merry Old XXX—land, soon to be known only as the Western Provinces of the EU. 

On an official UK Department of Education website called Teachernet, parents are told that

"For very young children, Father Christmas can be terrifying, and if you are planning a visit from Santa, you'll need to make sure that fearful children are near an exit." 

Where the children are to run away to isn't specified. Presumably the Fear of Santa Resuscitation Unit will be there to rescue little tykes.

According to the Telegraph,

"The site also suggested a list of non—competitive games to replace traditional games like pass—the—parcel, which it said can cause 'anxieties' in the children who do not win."

But apparently the real point of XXXX—mas celebrations is to learn
not to waste paper.
This weird obsession appears not once, but three
times
in the scientific advice given to parents.

Children should give their families "experience" presents, like
breakfast in bed, as opposed to wrapped presents. "These gifts can appear much more personal, as they have far more meaning and don't come surrounded by useless packaging," it said.

It's funny how American kids have this perverted love for wrapped presents, the bigger and more expensive, the better. But we know about Americans. Dastardly paper—wasting little munchkins!

"...  children should be discouraged from sending Christmas cards to fellow pupils because they are a waste of paper. ... 'why not try sending electronic Christmas cards?' the advice read."

The advice suggested that head teachers hold school assemblies, called 'The aftermath of Christmas,' in which children act out opening presents and advent calendars

"and then throw the packaging on the floor to highlight the waste of paper at Christmas."

And there we have it, folks, the real meaning of the holidays in the Age of PC.

The United States is hag—ridden by its very own PC Police, so we shouldn't sneer. Soon, we will have our own official instructions about the meaning of XXXX—mas, although we are not likely to be told the meaning of Ramadan in the same paper—saving spirit. Nobody is scared of devout Christians or Jews, but Muslim customs are given great deference these days in the British Isles. It makes a difference what you are willing to die and kill for Islam is now the only religion that is taken very, very seriously in Europe.

Ah, what would we do this XXXX Season without the jolly elves of PC?  Among the usual collection of religiophobic paranoid stories comes this gem from Merry Old XXX—land, soon to be known only as the Western Provinces of the EU. 

On an official UK Department of Education website called Teachernet, parents are told that

"For very young children, Father Christmas can be terrifying, and if you are planning a visit from Santa, you'll need to make sure that fearful children are near an exit." 

Where the children are to run away to isn't specified. Presumably the Fear of Santa Resuscitation Unit will be there to rescue little tykes.

According to the Telegraph,

"The site also suggested a list of non—competitive games to replace traditional games like pass—the—parcel, which it said can cause 'anxieties' in the children who do not win."

But apparently the real point of XXXX—mas celebrations is to learn
not to waste paper.
This weird obsession appears not once, but three
times
in the scientific advice given to parents.

Children should give their families "experience" presents, like
breakfast in bed, as opposed to wrapped presents. "These gifts can appear much more personal, as they have far more meaning and don't come surrounded by useless packaging," it said.

It's funny how American kids have this perverted love for wrapped presents, the bigger and more expensive, the better. But we know about Americans. Dastardly paper—wasting little munchkins!

"...  children should be discouraged from sending Christmas cards to fellow pupils because they are a waste of paper. ... 'why not try sending electronic Christmas cards?' the advice read."

The advice suggested that head teachers hold school assemblies, called 'The aftermath of Christmas,' in which children act out opening presents and advent calendars

"and then throw the packaging on the floor to highlight the waste of paper at Christmas."

And there we have it, folks, the real meaning of the holidays in the Age of PC.

The United States is hag—ridden by its very own PC Police, so we shouldn't sneer. Soon, we will have our own official instructions about the meaning of XXXX—mas, although we are not likely to be told the meaning of Ramadan in the same paper—saving spirit. Nobody is scared of devout Christians or Jews, but Muslim customs are given great deference these days in the British Isles. It makes a difference what you are willing to die and kill for Islam is now the only religion that is taken very, very seriously in Europe.