What if Roe is reversed?

Nina Easton of the Boston Globe plays the "what if?" game on a possible Supreme Court overturning of Roe v. Wade. Unsurpsingly, whe swallows whole a number of pro—abortion shibboleths in proclaiming that the GOP cold face trouble in suburban Congressional races.

First, the Supreme Court is very unlikely to overturn Roe in a single decision. Much more likely would be a willingness of the Court to reign in some of the most dramatic extensions of the absolute right proclaimed by Roe. Most Americans favor reasonable limits on abortion, such as ending partial birth infanticide.

Second, if Roe were overturned, abortion would not be instantly outlawed, despite what the pro—abortion lobby would have you believe. Abortion would become a matter of state regulation once again. Only in the red states would it be likely for abortion to be outlawed. Blue states would continue to allow abortion as permissively as the legislatures care to permit.

Third, the House of representatives has nothing to do with confirming Supreme Court Justices. Exactly what would candidates supporting Roe say to win over voters and get them to reject Republican incumbents?

Ms. Easton lives and works in Washington. Her appearances on Brit Hume's show indicate that she doesn't drool and can form coherent sentences on the first try. I woud expect better from her.

Thomas Lifson  11 17 05

Nina Easton of the Boston Globe plays the "what if?" game on a possible Supreme Court overturning of Roe v. Wade. Unsurpsingly, whe swallows whole a number of pro—abortion shibboleths in proclaiming that the GOP cold face trouble in suburban Congressional races.

First, the Supreme Court is very unlikely to overturn Roe in a single decision. Much more likely would be a willingness of the Court to reign in some of the most dramatic extensions of the absolute right proclaimed by Roe. Most Americans favor reasonable limits on abortion, such as ending partial birth infanticide.

Second, if Roe were overturned, abortion would not be instantly outlawed, despite what the pro—abortion lobby would have you believe. Abortion would become a matter of state regulation once again. Only in the red states would it be likely for abortion to be outlawed. Blue states would continue to allow abortion as permissively as the legislatures care to permit.

Third, the House of representatives has nothing to do with confirming Supreme Court Justices. Exactly what would candidates supporting Roe say to win over voters and get them to reject Republican incumbents?

Ms. Easton lives and works in Washington. Her appearances on Brit Hume's show indicate that she doesn't drool and can form coherent sentences on the first try. I woud expect better from her.

Thomas Lifson  11 17 05