Pervasive propaganda

By

Mediacrity catches New York Times film critic Stephen Holden casually slipping into a film review anti—Israel propaganda:

New York Times film critic Stephen Holden today reviews "Private," an Italian indie move on the Israel—Palestinian dispute that —— surprise, surprise —— portrays Israeli soldiers as monsters and Palestinians as victimized, peace—loving and generally just lovely people.

Winding up his equally predictable rave review, the film critic—global strategist Holden tosses in the following Counterpunch—worthy propaganda:

Upstairs in the rooms occupied by the soldiers, their commander. . . copes with the same challenges to his authority as those faced by [the Palestinian hero]. But "Private" also shows the human instinct to fight oppression, even if that rebellion risks disaster. It's what oppressed people do.

Mediacrity catches New York Times film critic Stephen Holden casually slipping into a film review anti—Israel propaganda:

New York Times film critic Stephen Holden today reviews "Private," an Italian indie move on the Israel—Palestinian dispute that —— surprise, surprise —— portrays Israeli soldiers as monsters and Palestinians as victimized, peace—loving and generally just lovely people.

Winding up his equally predictable rave review, the film critic—global strategist Holden tosses in the following Counterpunch—worthy propaganda:

Upstairs in the rooms occupied by the soldiers, their commander. . . copes with the same challenges to his authority as those faced by [the Palestinian hero]. But "Private" also shows the human instinct to fight oppression, even if that rebellion risks disaster. It's what oppressed people do.