Not fit to print

The motto of the New York Times, once known as "the paper of record" is "all the news that's fit to print." 
 
What's not fit to print, apparently, is information that contradicts their own biases; facts that contradict their deeply held beliefs.  The result is skewed news, incomplete news, unrecorded.  That's not news, that's opinion masquerading as news.
 
The latest example of this misinformation occurred when:

The family of a Marine killed in Iraq slammed The New York Times yesterday for selectively excerpting a letter he wrote predicting his own death, while the paper scandalously ignored a long passage in which he praised America's mission.
"I thought they hadn't finished the story, that they hadn't told the whole story," said Timothy Lickness, the uncle of Cpl. Jeffrey Starr, 22, who was killed in Ramadi in April during his third tour in Iraq.

"I wrote to the Times and said it would be proper to honor Jeff by completing the story. They never responded."

The hurt and dismayed family then told columnist and blogger Michelle Malkin what happened who wrote about it in her column.
 
For the real record, here is the omitted section of the letter.  It is definitely fit to print.
 
"I don't regret going, everybody dies, but few get to do it for something as important as freedom. It may seem confusing why we are in Iraq, it's not to me. I'm here helping these people, so that they can live the way we live. Not have to worry about tyrants or vicious dictators. To do what they want with their lives. To me, that is why I died. Others have died for my freedom, now this is my mark." 

Ethel C. Fenig   11 03 05

The motto of the New York Times, once known as "the paper of record" is "all the news that's fit to print." 
 
What's not fit to print, apparently, is information that contradicts their own biases; facts that contradict their deeply held beliefs.  The result is skewed news, incomplete news, unrecorded.  That's not news, that's opinion masquerading as news.
 
The latest example of this misinformation occurred when:

The family of a Marine killed in Iraq slammed The New York Times yesterday for selectively excerpting a letter he wrote predicting his own death, while the paper scandalously ignored a long passage in which he praised America's mission.
"I thought they hadn't finished the story, that they hadn't told the whole story," said Timothy Lickness, the uncle of Cpl. Jeffrey Starr, 22, who was killed in Ramadi in April during his third tour in Iraq.

"I wrote to the Times and said it would be proper to honor Jeff by completing the story. They never responded."

The hurt and dismayed family then told columnist and blogger Michelle Malkin what happened who wrote about it in her column.
 
For the real record, here is the omitted section of the letter.  It is definitely fit to print.
 
"I don't regret going, everybody dies, but few get to do it for something as important as freedom. It may seem confusing why we are in Iraq, it's not to me. I'm here helping these people, so that they can live the way we live. Not have to worry about tyrants or vicious dictators. To do what they want with their lives. To me, that is why I died. Others have died for my freedom, now this is my mark." 

Ethel C. Fenig   11 03 05