News from China

As President Bush makes his tour around East Asia, presumably trying to convince the regional leaders to make a greater effort to fight the global war on terror, he should focus on what is happening in the south China city of Guangzhou. 

According to CNN International, on Sunday, US embassy and consulates on the mainland and in Hong Kong said the US government had received "credible information that a terrorist threat may exist against official US
government facilities in Guangzhou".  

On Sunday, CNN reported:

"This threat also may exist for places where Americans are known to congregate or visit, including clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools or outdoor recreation events," the statement said.

"American citizens in south China are advised to be aware of their surroundings and remain alert to possible threats."

This warning comes just days after a similar terror, later retracted, from the American embassy in Beijing that Islamic extremists were plotting attacks against luxury hotels.  

While President Bush is preparing to meet the Chinese leadership in Beijing, a story from AP is bound to raise tensions.  AP explains:

A Chinese—American engineer and two family members who allegedly conspired to steal sensitive information about Navy warships and smuggle it to China were indicted Tuesday on federal charges, authorities said.

Meanwhile,

It seems Hilter comparisons are moving across the Pacific.  Many extreme liberals in America like to compare President Bush to Adolf Hilter. Now, according to the Japan Times, Chinese Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing has harshly criticized Japan's Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to the controvsial Yasukuni Shrine by referring to Adolf Hitler and Nazis.

The Japan Times says:

"What would European people think if German leaders were to visit (memorials) related to Hitler and Nazis?" he asked reporters.

"Have the Japanese people ever considered whether Asian people's feelings are hurt by Japanese leaders paying homage to war criminals who launched a war that victimized so many people?" he said ahead of a ministerial meeting of the Asia—Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.

Sino—Japanese relations, Li said, "face difficulties, but China is not responsible for that."

Brian Schwarz   11 16 05

As President Bush makes his tour around East Asia, presumably trying to convince the regional leaders to make a greater effort to fight the global war on terror, he should focus on what is happening in the south China city of Guangzhou. 

According to CNN International, on Sunday, US embassy and consulates on the mainland and in Hong Kong said the US government had received "credible information that a terrorist threat may exist against official US
government facilities in Guangzhou".  

On Sunday, CNN reported:

"This threat also may exist for places where Americans are known to congregate or visit, including clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools or outdoor recreation events," the statement said.

"American citizens in south China are advised to be aware of their surroundings and remain alert to possible threats."

This warning comes just days after a similar terror, later retracted, from the American embassy in Beijing that Islamic extremists were plotting attacks against luxury hotels.  

While President Bush is preparing to meet the Chinese leadership in Beijing, a story from AP is bound to raise tensions.  AP explains:

A Chinese—American engineer and two family members who allegedly conspired to steal sensitive information about Navy warships and smuggle it to China were indicted Tuesday on federal charges, authorities said.

Meanwhile,

It seems Hilter comparisons are moving across the Pacific.  Many extreme liberals in America like to compare President Bush to Adolf Hilter. Now, according to the Japan Times, Chinese Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing has harshly criticized Japan's Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to the controvsial Yasukuni Shrine by referring to Adolf Hitler and Nazis.

The Japan Times says:

"What would European people think if German leaders were to visit (memorials) related to Hitler and Nazis?" he asked reporters.

"Have the Japanese people ever considered whether Asian people's feelings are hurt by Japanese leaders paying homage to war criminals who launched a war that victimized so many people?" he said ahead of a ministerial meeting of the Asia—Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.

Sino—Japanese relations, Li said, "face difficulties, but China is not responsible for that."

Brian Schwarz   11 16 05