Katrina blowback

By

The Los Angeles Times describes the vast changes underway in Louisiana politics as a result of the population dislocations in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In a nutshell, much of the Democratic base in New Orleans has not come home, changing the balance of power in the state from pretty even to decidedly Republican.

As a result, the amount of pork flowing from the state legislature to New Orleans is diminished. And eventual redistricting will further enhance the power of  Republicans, whose districts have gained population. Democrats are in despair.

The GOP could well pick up one or two more seats in the House of Representatives, and Democrat Mary Landrieu may have trouble holding onto her seat, not to mention hapless Governor Blanco.

While press coverage of the Hurricane aftermath did hurt President Bush and the GOP, there are definite signs that a blowback is underway. The questionable behavior of some refugees, with stories of lap dances and luxury goods purchased with aid dollars and other outrages, is having an effect. And in the long run, the swing of Louisiana into the solidly red column could be the most lasting political effect.

Ed Lasky, Rich Baehr and Tom Lifson   11 17 05

The Los Angeles Times describes the vast changes underway in Louisiana politics as a result of the population dislocations in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. In a nutshell, much of the Democratic base in New Orleans has not come home, changing the balance of power in the state from pretty even to decidedly Republican.

As a result, the amount of pork flowing from the state legislature to New Orleans is diminished. And eventual redistricting will further enhance the power of  Republicans, whose districts have gained population. Democrats are in despair.

The GOP could well pick up one or two more seats in the House of Representatives, and Democrat Mary Landrieu may have trouble holding onto her seat, not to mention hapless Governor Blanco.

While press coverage of the Hurricane aftermath did hurt President Bush and the GOP, there are definite signs that a blowback is underway. The questionable behavior of some refugees, with stories of lap dances and luxury goods purchased with aid dollars and other outrages, is having an effect. And in the long run, the swing of Louisiana into the solidly red column could be the most lasting political effect.

Ed Lasky, Rich Baehr and Tom Lifson   11 17 05