John Edwards, myth-maker

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A John Edwards op—ed repeats the myth and canard of manipulated intelligence. Edwards, the erstwhile Presidential candidate, tries the "I made a Mistake" gambit to explain his vote to approve the war in 2002.* We probably can expect more of these "admissions" in the future. Undoubtedly, they are a response to the contemporary publication in many right—leaning outlets of statements the Democrats made in support of defanging Saddam Hussein during the Clinton Administration and in the aftermath of 9/11. 

They will also be a defense against George Bush's charge that it is the Democrats who are manipulating facts to support an Orwellian distortion of their own history involving Hussein. Of course,  it is also an effort to contrast himself with George Bush, who is unfairly criticized for refusing to admit mistakes. But somehow, this also brings to mind the George Romney "I was brainwashed" statement.
 
Also, Edwards attacks Halliburton and thus Dick Cheney, and alludes to Halliburton as being responsible for giving America a "black eye" among Iraqis. I suppose he wants us to view Halliburton as the modern—day equivalent of the rapacious Belgium King Leopold who tormented the Belgium Congo in his relentless quest for riches derived from rubber cultivation.
 
The Iraqis themselves have criticized their neighbors for helping the terrorists who are tormenting them now and for ignoring or worsening their plight under Hussein. The Iraqis have no credible expectation of receiving "help" from its neighbors—so why should the singularly ill—informed (at best; naive, ignorant or self—serving at worst) Edwards expect some radical conversion into helpful neighbors from them?
 
* Also, harkens back to Ronald Reagan's politically successful admission of responsibility in the aftermath of the Beirut terror attacks that killed over 200 Marines.

Ed Lasky  11 13 05

A John Edwards op—ed repeats the myth and canard of manipulated intelligence. Edwards, the erstwhile Presidential candidate, tries the "I made a Mistake" gambit to explain his vote to approve the war in 2002.* We probably can expect more of these "admissions" in the future. Undoubtedly, they are a response to the contemporary publication in many right—leaning outlets of statements the Democrats made in support of defanging Saddam Hussein during the Clinton Administration and in the aftermath of 9/11. 

They will also be a defense against George Bush's charge that it is the Democrats who are manipulating facts to support an Orwellian distortion of their own history involving Hussein. Of course,  it is also an effort to contrast himself with George Bush, who is unfairly criticized for refusing to admit mistakes. But somehow, this also brings to mind the George Romney "I was brainwashed" statement.
 
Also, Edwards attacks Halliburton and thus Dick Cheney, and alludes to Halliburton as being responsible for giving America a "black eye" among Iraqis. I suppose he wants us to view Halliburton as the modern—day equivalent of the rapacious Belgium King Leopold who tormented the Belgium Congo in his relentless quest for riches derived from rubber cultivation.
 
The Iraqis themselves have criticized their neighbors for helping the terrorists who are tormenting them now and for ignoring or worsening their plight under Hussein. The Iraqis have no credible expectation of receiving "help" from its neighbors—so why should the singularly ill—informed (at best; naive, ignorant or self—serving at worst) Edwards expect some radical conversion into helpful neighbors from them?
 
* Also, harkens back to Ronald Reagan's politically successful admission of responsibility in the aftermath of the Beirut terror attacks that killed over 200 Marines.

Ed Lasky  11 13 05