Iran acquiring advanced space technology

According to the AP, Iran is "snapping up" space technology as fast as it can be purchased, apparently in the fear that restrictions will be placed on space technology sales similar to those now in place for nuclear teachnology. We are fortunate that Bill Clinton is not in place to allow a Bernard Schwartz—like figure (former CEO of Loral) to sell to Iran the same advanced missile—launching secrets that were sold to China, leapfrogging their space program ahead by at least a decade.

Iran has already achieved alarming capabilitites in space:

Iran joined the space club last month when it launched its first small satellite, the Sina—1, aboard a Russian rocket.

That orbiter was Russian—made, but Iran built its second satellite, the Mesbah, with help from the Italian company Carlo Gavazzi Space. Mesbah is due to be carried into space by a Russian rocket in about two months.

The two satellites will give Iran a limited capability to monitor the entire Middle East.

Iran's next goal is to launch a satellite with one of its own rockets. Iranian officials say they are developing a Shahab—4 missile that could lift a satellite into orbit, but have not given details on when it will be ready.

``We have to move quickly and achieve our goals in space. Otherwise, we will face political, economic and security threats,'' Movaseghinia said.

Eric Schwappach   11 30 05

According to the AP, Iran is "snapping up" space technology as fast as it can be purchased, apparently in the fear that restrictions will be placed on space technology sales similar to those now in place for nuclear teachnology. We are fortunate that Bill Clinton is not in place to allow a Bernard Schwartz—like figure (former CEO of Loral) to sell to Iran the same advanced missile—launching secrets that were sold to China, leapfrogging their space program ahead by at least a decade.

Iran has already achieved alarming capabilitites in space:

Iran joined the space club last month when it launched its first small satellite, the Sina—1, aboard a Russian rocket.

That orbiter was Russian—made, but Iran built its second satellite, the Mesbah, with help from the Italian company Carlo Gavazzi Space. Mesbah is due to be carried into space by a Russian rocket in about two months.

The two satellites will give Iran a limited capability to monitor the entire Middle East.

Iran's next goal is to launch a satellite with one of its own rockets. Iranian officials say they are developing a Shahab—4 missile that could lift a satellite into orbit, but have not given details on when it will be ready.

``We have to move quickly and achieve our goals in space. Otherwise, we will face political, economic and security threats,'' Movaseghinia said.

Eric Schwappach   11 30 05