Good fences make safer citizens

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As Robert Frost wrote decades ago, "Good fences make good neighbors."  And if the neighbors aren't good, good fences make innocent citizens safer.  As a result, many countries are now constructing them, but as noted earlier, the world matter of factly acknowledges India's need for a barrier against Moslem terror while condemning Israel for its security fence.

And now it appears that the once controversial idea of a fence along the Us—Mexican border is becoming more acceptable when justified as another means to keep out terrorists. 

A once—radical idea to build a 2,000—mile steel—and—wire fence on the U.S.—Mexican border is gaining momentum amid warnings that terrorists can easily sneak into the country.

In Congress, a powerful Republican lawmaker this week proposed building such a fence across the entire border and two dozen other lawmakers signed on. And via the Internet, a group called weneedafence.com has raised enough money to air TV ads warning that the border is open to terrorists.

Even at the Homeland Security Department, which opposes building a border—long fence, Secretary Michael Chertoff this fall waived environmental laws so that construction can continue on a 14—mile section of fence near San Diego that has helped border agents stem the flow of illegal migrants and drug runners.

'You have to be able to enforce your borders,' says California Rep. Duncan Hunter, the Republican chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. He's proposing a fence from San Diego to Brownsville, Texas. 'It's no longer just an immigration issue. It's now a national security issue.'

Colin Hanna of weneedafence.com says 'there is incredible momentum on this issue,' fueled by the specter of another Sept. 11. His group aired TV ads in Washington, D.C., this fall and plans more next year.

Brace yourself——criticism is sure to come but it certainly is an idea whose time has come.  Ask India. Israel.  And yes, even Saudi Arabia.  Ask any homeowner who has a fence around the house. They've all built/are building barriers for their protection.  It seems the US should add this to our defenses.
 
Ethel C. Fenig   11 17 05

As Robert Frost wrote decades ago, "Good fences make good neighbors."  And if the neighbors aren't good, good fences make innocent citizens safer.  As a result, many countries are now constructing them, but as noted earlier, the world matter of factly acknowledges India's need for a barrier against Moslem terror while condemning Israel for its security fence.

And now it appears that the once controversial idea of a fence along the Us—Mexican border is becoming more acceptable when justified as another means to keep out terrorists. 

A once—radical idea to build a 2,000—mile steel—and—wire fence on the U.S.—Mexican border is gaining momentum amid warnings that terrorists can easily sneak into the country.

In Congress, a powerful Republican lawmaker this week proposed building such a fence across the entire border and two dozen other lawmakers signed on. And via the Internet, a group called weneedafence.com has raised enough money to air TV ads warning that the border is open to terrorists.

Even at the Homeland Security Department, which opposes building a border—long fence, Secretary Michael Chertoff this fall waived environmental laws so that construction can continue on a 14—mile section of fence near San Diego that has helped border agents stem the flow of illegal migrants and drug runners.

'You have to be able to enforce your borders,' says California Rep. Duncan Hunter, the Republican chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. He's proposing a fence from San Diego to Brownsville, Texas. 'It's no longer just an immigration issue. It's now a national security issue.'

Colin Hanna of weneedafence.com says 'there is incredible momentum on this issue,' fueled by the specter of another Sept. 11. His group aired TV ads in Washington, D.C., this fall and plans more next year.

Brace yourself——criticism is sure to come but it certainly is an idea whose time has come.  Ask India. Israel.  And yes, even Saudi Arabia.  Ask any homeowner who has a fence around the house. They've all built/are building barriers for their protection.  It seems the US should add this to our defenses.
 
Ethel C. Fenig   11 17 05