CENTCOM Reports

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The CENTCOM Newsletter for the week of 7 November 2005 can be found here.  Among this week's stories:

  •  Base Camp Adder (Ali Base) Iraq — Local workers completed renovations to the Nasiriyah Intelligence Police Station in late October.  The station houses anti—drug and anti—terrorism units and employs police from throughout Nasiriyah.  Police station renovations not only enhance security and professional facilities for law enforcement staff, but also provide a higher level of professional police protection for local citizens.

  •  KAREZGAY PROVINCE, Afghanistan — Airmen participating in the ongoing Global War on Terrorism at nearby Bagram Air Field took time to spread some cheer and share smiles with the people of Afghanistan as part of an Adopt—A—Village visit here Nov. 3.  More than 1,200 pounds of winter clothes, blankets, school supplies and toys were distributed to the local village, according to Master Sgt. Edgar Langdon, Bagram's Adopt—A—Village coordinator.

  •  Iraq Project and Contracting Office Baghdad, Iraq— In February 2004, the Project and Contracting Office (PCO), then known as the Project Management Office (PMO), was beginning the daunting task of rebuilding Iraq. Christopher Riesch, a Soldier liaising with the PMO's Electricity Sector, saw a lot of money spent on reconstruction projects and thought there must be a better way.  'As a Civil Affairs Soldier, said Reisch, 'I was already out in the streets and familiar with the communities, and I found myself wondering why we couldn't work with local Iraqis to get projects done and skip the western contractors altogether, thereby cutting construction costs and completion time.'

  •  U.S. Disaster Assistance Center Pakistan — A U.S. military field hospital in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan treated its 1,000th patient the evening of Nov. 6.  The 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital deployed to Muzaffarabad as part of the United States' support to the Pakistani—led relief effort resulting from the devastating earthquake Oct. 8 that caused heavy damage in the Kashmir and Northwest Frontier Provinces, Pakistan.

  • A CENTCOM new release also updates the current situation on Operation Steel Curtain.

    CAMP BLUE DIAMOND, AR RAMADI, Iraq — Approximately 1,000 Iraqi Army Soldiers and 2,500 Marines, Soldiers and Sailors with Regimental Combat Team — 2 continue clearing the town of Karabilah of terrorists and weapons in Operation al Hajip Elfulathi (Steel Curtain).

    Clearing of Karabilah is slow and dangerous work for the Iraqi Soldiers and Marines because of the high concentration of hidden bombs in the city.  Since the operation began seven days ago, 67 mines and improvised explosive devices have been discovered.  These bombs are frequently placed in trash piles and buried in the soft dirt.  On some occasions entire homes are rigged with explosives. Iraqi Soldiers and Marines today found a home booby—trapped with a 60—pound explosive charge and 10 large explosive rounds.  Due to the danger posed by these explosives, they were destroyed in place.

    Compiled by Doug Hanson  11 13 05

    The CENTCOM Newsletter for the week of 7 November 2005 can be found here.  Among this week's stories:

  •  Base Camp Adder (Ali Base) Iraq — Local workers completed renovations to the Nasiriyah Intelligence Police Station in late October.  The station houses anti—drug and anti—terrorism units and employs police from throughout Nasiriyah.  Police station renovations not only enhance security and professional facilities for law enforcement staff, but also provide a higher level of professional police protection for local citizens.

  •  KAREZGAY PROVINCE, Afghanistan — Airmen participating in the ongoing Global War on Terrorism at nearby Bagram Air Field took time to spread some cheer and share smiles with the people of Afghanistan as part of an Adopt—A—Village visit here Nov. 3.  More than 1,200 pounds of winter clothes, blankets, school supplies and toys were distributed to the local village, according to Master Sgt. Edgar Langdon, Bagram's Adopt—A—Village coordinator.

  •  Iraq Project and Contracting Office Baghdad, Iraq— In February 2004, the Project and Contracting Office (PCO), then known as the Project Management Office (PMO), was beginning the daunting task of rebuilding Iraq. Christopher Riesch, a Soldier liaising with the PMO's Electricity Sector, saw a lot of money spent on reconstruction projects and thought there must be a better way.  'As a Civil Affairs Soldier, said Reisch, 'I was already out in the streets and familiar with the communities, and I found myself wondering why we couldn't work with local Iraqis to get projects done and skip the western contractors altogether, thereby cutting construction costs and completion time.'

  •  U.S. Disaster Assistance Center Pakistan — A U.S. military field hospital in Muzaffarabad, Pakistan treated its 1,000th patient the evening of Nov. 6.  The 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital deployed to Muzaffarabad as part of the United States' support to the Pakistani—led relief effort resulting from the devastating earthquake Oct. 8 that caused heavy damage in the Kashmir and Northwest Frontier Provinces, Pakistan.

  • A CENTCOM new release also updates the current situation on Operation Steel Curtain.

    CAMP BLUE DIAMOND, AR RAMADI, Iraq — Approximately 1,000 Iraqi Army Soldiers and 2,500 Marines, Soldiers and Sailors with Regimental Combat Team — 2 continue clearing the town of Karabilah of terrorists and weapons in Operation al Hajip Elfulathi (Steel Curtain).

    Clearing of Karabilah is slow and dangerous work for the Iraqi Soldiers and Marines because of the high concentration of hidden bombs in the city.  Since the operation began seven days ago, 67 mines and improvised explosive devices have been discovered.  These bombs are frequently placed in trash piles and buried in the soft dirt.  On some occasions entire homes are rigged with explosives. Iraqi Soldiers and Marines today found a home booby—trapped with a 60—pound explosive charge and 10 large explosive rounds.  Due to the danger posed by these explosives, they were destroyed in place.

    Compiled by Doug Hanson  11 13 05