BRAC becomes law

I suppose there is one advantage to the current Congressional quagmire.  Legislation that is forwarded for Congressional review with the provision that no objection results in concurrence will allow this type of bill to become law.  Such is the case with Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) legislation.  My earlier prediction of a bitter DoD — Congressional fight over base closures, particularly over National Guard and Reserve installations, has apparently proven wrong, as BRAC has been shoved aside in favor of political infighting over judicial nominations, CIA leaks, budget cutting measures, et al.

The Army News Service reports that BRAC officially took effect at 12:01 a.m. Nov. 9 after Congress allowed the measure to pass into law.  The BRAC commission delivered its final report to the President Sept. 8, and he sent it to Congress for legislative review Sept. 15.  Congress had 45 legislative days to accept or reject the report in its entirety, and was not authorized to make changes to the closure list.

Impact on the US Army consists of closing 12 major installations over the next six years.  Most importantly, BRAC will close hundreds of Army Reserve centers and National Guard armories of low military value, and will replace them with new multi—component armed forces reserve centers.  The Army Reserve Command will also disestablish its 10 Regional Readiness Commands and stand up four Regional Readiness Sustainment Commands, six sustainment brigades and two maneuver enhancement brigades.  The Regional Readiness Sustainment Commands will be located at: Fort Dix, N.J., Fort Jackson, S.C., Fort McCoy, Wis., Moffett Field, Calif.

While Congress dawdles, our military marches forward to transform and reorganize for the 21st century.

Doug Hanson  11—13—05

I suppose there is one advantage to the current Congressional quagmire.  Legislation that is forwarded for Congressional review with the provision that no objection results in concurrence will allow this type of bill to become law.  Such is the case with Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) legislation.  My earlier prediction of a bitter DoD — Congressional fight over base closures, particularly over National Guard and Reserve installations, has apparently proven wrong, as BRAC has been shoved aside in favor of political infighting over judicial nominations, CIA leaks, budget cutting measures, et al.

The Army News Service reports that BRAC officially took effect at 12:01 a.m. Nov. 9 after Congress allowed the measure to pass into law.  The BRAC commission delivered its final report to the President Sept. 8, and he sent it to Congress for legislative review Sept. 15.  Congress had 45 legislative days to accept or reject the report in its entirety, and was not authorized to make changes to the closure list.

Impact on the US Army consists of closing 12 major installations over the next six years.  Most importantly, BRAC will close hundreds of Army Reserve centers and National Guard armories of low military value, and will replace them with new multi—component armed forces reserve centers.  The Army Reserve Command will also disestablish its 10 Regional Readiness Commands and stand up four Regional Readiness Sustainment Commands, six sustainment brigades and two maneuver enhancement brigades.  The Regional Readiness Sustainment Commands will be located at: Fort Dix, N.J., Fort Jackson, S.C., Fort McCoy, Wis., Moffett Field, Calif.

While Congress dawdles, our military marches forward to transform and reorganize for the 21st century.

Doug Hanson  11—13—05