Stereophonic SCOTUS rumble: the right channel is louder

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The battle cry of the American conservative movement was sounded by its Godfather, Barry Goldwater, at the 1964 Republican convention when he proclaimed, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."
 
I have no idea how many wall plaques with that quote today hang in the offices or studies of conservatives. But I have a sneaking suspicion that the sentiment contained therein girded the loins of all those poised for a confirmation battle over the next SCOTUS nominee. When Bush announced Ms. Miers, the conservative reaction was one of disbelief. If there was one thing they knew he wouldn't waffle on, it would be in the naming of a Supreme Court justice. Now the time would have finally arrived to avenge Sen. Kennedy's destruction of Robert Bork. Principle and justice would rule the day.
 
Miers? Poof! No where to direct all that stored—up adrenaline! Hence came the perfect op—ed storm.
 
I think Jonah Goldberg has it about right over at National Review. It's a matter of trust. Conservatives don't trust President Bush. And in my most humble opinion they have good reason not to. But that's for another day.
 
In the meantime, it's quite possible that Harriet Miers will prove to be an outstanding conservative justice. Just not the originalist juggernaut conservatives were hoping for.
 
Dennis Sevakis   10 05 05
The battle cry of the American conservative movement was sounded by its Godfather, Barry Goldwater, at the 1964 Republican convention when he proclaimed, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."
 
I have no idea how many wall plaques with that quote today hang in the offices or studies of conservatives. But I have a sneaking suspicion that the sentiment contained therein girded the loins of all those poised for a confirmation battle over the next SCOTUS nominee. When Bush announced Ms. Miers, the conservative reaction was one of disbelief. If there was one thing they knew he wouldn't waffle on, it would be in the naming of a Supreme Court justice. Now the time would have finally arrived to avenge Sen. Kennedy's destruction of Robert Bork. Principle and justice would rule the day.
 
Miers? Poof! No where to direct all that stored—up adrenaline! Hence came the perfect op—ed storm.
 
I think Jonah Goldberg has it about right over at National Review. It's a matter of trust. Conservatives don't trust President Bush. And in my most humble opinion they have good reason not to. But that's for another day.
 
In the meantime, it's quite possible that Harriet Miers will prove to be an outstanding conservative justice. Just not the originalist juggernaut conservatives were hoping for.
 
Dennis Sevakis   10 05 05