Standing up to evil in Colombia

Terrorism is an unmitigated and absolute evil. It's also perfectly definable. At the Ibero—American Summit in Salamanca, Spain this morning, mysteriously missed by Fidel Castro (see why here), President Alvaro Uribe of Colombia, stood up to a shady underhanded effort by the Marxist governments of Venezuela and Cuba to equivocate on terrorism, stunningly enough, to defend the dreaded FARC guerrillas of Colombia, who this week set off a car—bomb attack on the Colombian capital seen here, here  and here.

President Uribe's moral clarity can be seen here:

The Colombian president instructed his foreign minister, Carolina
Barco, not to sign any declaration that is not clear in its definition of "terrorist groups." "If they (alluding to the FARC) are not described as terrorists, we won't sign that, period. You can't call 'irregulars' those who set off car bombs," Uribe told the foreign minister in a telephone conversation that EFE witnessed.

The good news is that every country in the region is coming to see the evil for what it is and support President Uribe in his struggle against Marxist terrorism. They are doing it as a group and rejecting Chavez and Castro.

This may be part of a broader trend. Daniel Duquenal also noted  growing opposition to Chavez in the region, based on a recent trip to Panama (see also Daniel's comments section on this post).

With Daniel's observations and with what has just happened in Spain, Chavez and Castro appear to be on the path to being decisively rejected by the region. When the entire hemisphere comes together on these two communist thugs, they will be history. It's beginning.

A.M. Mora y Leon 10 14 05

Terrorism is an unmitigated and absolute evil. It's also perfectly definable. At the Ibero—American Summit in Salamanca, Spain this morning, mysteriously missed by Fidel Castro (see why here), President Alvaro Uribe of Colombia, stood up to a shady underhanded effort by the Marxist governments of Venezuela and Cuba to equivocate on terrorism, stunningly enough, to defend the dreaded FARC guerrillas of Colombia, who this week set off a car—bomb attack on the Colombian capital seen here, here  and here.

President Uribe's moral clarity can be seen here:

The Colombian president instructed his foreign minister, Carolina
Barco, not to sign any declaration that is not clear in its definition of "terrorist groups." "If they (alluding to the FARC) are not described as terrorists, we won't sign that, period. You can't call 'irregulars' those who set off car bombs," Uribe told the foreign minister in a telephone conversation that EFE witnessed.

The good news is that every country in the region is coming to see the evil for what it is and support President Uribe in his struggle against Marxist terrorism. They are doing it as a group and rejecting Chavez and Castro.

This may be part of a broader trend. Daniel Duquenal also noted  growing opposition to Chavez in the region, based on a recent trip to Panama (see also Daniel's comments section on this post).

With Daniel's observations and with what has just happened in Spain, Chavez and Castro appear to be on the path to being decisively rejected by the region. When the entire hemisphere comes together on these two communist thugs, they will be history. It's beginning.

A.M. Mora y Leon 10 14 05