Correction needs more correcting

By

The mainstream media seems to have an extremely difficult time telling the truth about Plamegate. Walter Pincus and Dana Milbank's correction on October 25 of Pincus' almost 2 1/2 year old story in which he credited Joseph Wilson IV's claims and gave them wide distribution has itself been corrected.
 
Here is the latest version with this notation:

An Oct. 25 article incorrectly said President Bush asserted during his January 2003 State of the Union message that Iraq was seeking nuclear material in Niger. The president said that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein had sought significant quantities of uranium in Africa.

One more correction is necessary, deleting the assertion that Wilson's claim on this point "has been validated by postwar weapons inspections".

AsStephen Spruieill observes:

This is incorrect. Postwar weapons inspections found no evidence that Iraq had actually purchased uranium from Niger, but as for seeking uranium from Niger, both Wilson's conversation with the former prime minister of Niger and the British intelligence to which Bush referred indicated that Saddam had sought uranium from Niger (the Anchoress linked to the relevant British intelligence and Senate Intelligence Committee reports). How could postwar inspections validate the claim that Saddam never sought to purchase uranium from Niger?

Clarice Feldman  10 28 05

The mainstream media seems to have an extremely difficult time telling the truth about Plamegate. Walter Pincus and Dana Milbank's correction on October 25 of Pincus' almost 2 1/2 year old story in which he credited Joseph Wilson IV's claims and gave them wide distribution has itself been corrected.
 
Here is the latest version with this notation:

An Oct. 25 article incorrectly said President Bush asserted during his January 2003 State of the Union message that Iraq was seeking nuclear material in Niger. The president said that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein had sought significant quantities of uranium in Africa.

One more correction is necessary, deleting the assertion that Wilson's claim on this point "has been validated by postwar weapons inspections".

AsStephen Spruieill observes:

This is incorrect. Postwar weapons inspections found no evidence that Iraq had actually purchased uranium from Niger, but as for seeking uranium from Niger, both Wilson's conversation with the former prime minister of Niger and the British intelligence to which Bush referred indicated that Saddam had sought uranium from Niger (the Anchoress linked to the relevant British intelligence and Senate Intelligence Committee reports). How could postwar inspections validate the claim that Saddam never sought to purchase uranium from Niger?

Clarice Feldman  10 28 05