Conservatism has not been tried and found wanting

By

G.K. Chesterton once asserted that 'The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried." If for 'Christian' one substitutes 'conservative' in the aforementioned quotation, I would surmise that one could thereby capture the essence of conservative objection to the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, and the concomitant mistrust of President Bush which underlies that objection. For Mr. Bush, his Administration, and the Congressional leadership have, with few exceptions, exhibited little inclination towards conservative thought, legislation or executive fiat.

As Robert Samuelson says over at the Washington Post:

Just what conservative values Mr. Bush's approach ('Compassionate Conservatism' or 'Spend more; tax less') embodies is unclear. He has not tried to purge government of ineffective or unneeded programs. He has not laid a foundation for permanent tax reductions. He has not been straightforward with the public. He has not shown a true regard for the future. He has mostly been expedient or, more pointedly, cynical.

Those who continue to support Mr. Bush's approach to governing the country are part of a rapidly shrinking minority. The Real Clear Politics poll compilation shows Mr. Bush's approval rating dragging at about 42%, while by two—to—one Americans think the country's moving in the wrong direction.

Somebody had better look at the wall. There's handwriting all over it.

Dennis Sevakis   10 08 05

G.K. Chesterton once asserted that 'The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried." If for 'Christian' one substitutes 'conservative' in the aforementioned quotation, I would surmise that one could thereby capture the essence of conservative objection to the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, and the concomitant mistrust of President Bush which underlies that objection. For Mr. Bush, his Administration, and the Congressional leadership have, with few exceptions, exhibited little inclination towards conservative thought, legislation or executive fiat.

As Robert Samuelson says over at the Washington Post:

Just what conservative values Mr. Bush's approach ('Compassionate Conservatism' or 'Spend more; tax less') embodies is unclear. He has not tried to purge government of ineffective or unneeded programs. He has not laid a foundation for permanent tax reductions. He has not been straightforward with the public. He has not shown a true regard for the future. He has mostly been expedient or, more pointedly, cynical.

Those who continue to support Mr. Bush's approach to governing the country are part of a rapidly shrinking minority. The Real Clear Politics poll compilation shows Mr. Bush's approval rating dragging at about 42%, while by two—to—one Americans think the country's moving in the wrong direction.

Somebody had better look at the wall. There's handwriting all over it.

Dennis Sevakis   10 08 05