Churchill and the Anglosphere

Winston Churchill has been credited with creating and promoting the idea of an Anglosphere: a partnership between America and England that would benefit the world. People frustrated and disheartened by the fecklessness of the United Nations and  disgusted by continental European leaders have built upon the Churchillian idea of such an alliance and expanded it to include other English—speaking democracies*.

For those interested in learning about the genesis of this idea, a new book by Martin Gilbert, Churchill and America is well—worth reading. Gilbert is the official biographer of Winston Churchill and wrote the most moving biography I have ever read (Churchill: A Life). In his new book, Gilbert deftly explores the origin of Churchill's love of America (it was based on much more than his American—born mother) and places it in the context of Churchill's recognition that America and England share beliefs which would benefit the people of the world.
 
Churchill believed that both countries shared common conceptions of what was "right and decent", had "a marked regard for fair play," especially to the weak and the poor. Both shared a "stern sentiment of impartial justice, and above all a love of personal freedom".
 
In his own words:

I therefore preach continually the doctrine of the fraternal association of our two peoples, not for any purpose of gaining invidious material advantages for either of them, nor for territorial aggrandizement or the vain pomp of earthly domination, but for the sake of service to mankind and for the honour that comes to those who faithfully serve great causes".

In another speech, he held that:

I have never asked for an Anglo—American military alliance or a treaty. I asked for something different and in a sense I have asked for something more. I asked for fraternal association, free, voluntary fraternal association. I have no doubt that it will come to pass, a surely as the sun will rise tomorrow" and that "nothing can obscure the fact that, in their harmonious companionship, lies the main hope of a world instrument for maintaining peace on earth and goodwill to all men". 

The hero of the 20th century was prophetic about the dangers of Nazi Germany and Russian communism, but he was also prophetic about the need for an Anglosphere. Pick up the book—you will not be disappointed.

* See the book The Anglosphere Challenge:Why The English—Speaking Nations Will Lead the way in the Twenty—First Century 

Ed Lasky   10 09 05

Winston Churchill has been credited with creating and promoting the idea of an Anglosphere: a partnership between America and England that would benefit the world. People frustrated and disheartened by the fecklessness of the United Nations and  disgusted by continental European leaders have built upon the Churchillian idea of such an alliance and expanded it to include other English—speaking democracies*.

For those interested in learning about the genesis of this idea, a new book by Martin Gilbert, Churchill and America is well—worth reading. Gilbert is the official biographer of Winston Churchill and wrote the most moving biography I have ever read (Churchill: A Life). In his new book, Gilbert deftly explores the origin of Churchill's love of America (it was based on much more than his American—born mother) and places it in the context of Churchill's recognition that America and England share beliefs which would benefit the people of the world.
 
Churchill believed that both countries shared common conceptions of what was "right and decent", had "a marked regard for fair play," especially to the weak and the poor. Both shared a "stern sentiment of impartial justice, and above all a love of personal freedom".
 
In his own words:

I therefore preach continually the doctrine of the fraternal association of our two peoples, not for any purpose of gaining invidious material advantages for either of them, nor for territorial aggrandizement or the vain pomp of earthly domination, but for the sake of service to mankind and for the honour that comes to those who faithfully serve great causes".

In another speech, he held that:

I have never asked for an Anglo—American military alliance or a treaty. I asked for something different and in a sense I have asked for something more. I asked for fraternal association, free, voluntary fraternal association. I have no doubt that it will come to pass, a surely as the sun will rise tomorrow" and that "nothing can obscure the fact that, in their harmonious companionship, lies the main hope of a world instrument for maintaining peace on earth and goodwill to all men". 

The hero of the 20th century was prophetic about the dangers of Nazi Germany and Russian communism, but he was also prophetic about the need for an Anglosphere. Pick up the book—you will not be disappointed.

* See the book The Anglosphere Challenge:Why The English—Speaking Nations Will Lead the way in the Twenty—First Century 

Ed Lasky   10 09 05