Change comes to the Middle East slowly

Slowly, and with many a step backward, the Middle East may be moving forward towars reconciliation with the existence of Israel. Consider this:

Jordan bans airing of anti—Semitic TV series
 
Amman: Jordan has banned broadcast of a controversial mini—series criticised as anti—Semitic, winning praise yesterday from Israel and a Washington—based media watchdog.
Twenty—two episodes of Al Shatat, Arabic for The Diaspora, were broadcast by a new Jordan—based satellite station before the government pulled the plug on Friday.

"We welcome the cessation of such an anti—Semitic and anti—Israeli TV program," said Israeli Embassy Press Attache Jacob Raber.

The Coalition Against Terrorist Media, one of several US—based groups which monitor the media in the Arab world, said it applauded the Jordanian government for banning the series broadcast on Mamnou TV, Arabic for prohibited.

Al Shatat included characters portraying Jews speaking of a global Jewish government.

In one scene, an actress playing a diseased prostitute in a European brothel run by a Jewish madam speaks of her desire to infect non—Jews.

The series was based on the The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Jordanian officials remained tight—lipped on the ban, apparently to avoid agitating a public opinion here already frustrated with Israel's peace policies.

Eric Schwappach  10 31 05

Slowly, and with many a step backward, the Middle East may be moving forward towars reconciliation with the existence of Israel. Consider this:

Jordan bans airing of anti—Semitic TV series
 
Amman: Jordan has banned broadcast of a controversial mini—series criticised as anti—Semitic, winning praise yesterday from Israel and a Washington—based media watchdog.
Twenty—two episodes of Al Shatat, Arabic for The Diaspora, were broadcast by a new Jordan—based satellite station before the government pulled the plug on Friday.

"We welcome the cessation of such an anti—Semitic and anti—Israeli TV program," said Israeli Embassy Press Attache Jacob Raber.

The Coalition Against Terrorist Media, one of several US—based groups which monitor the media in the Arab world, said it applauded the Jordanian government for banning the series broadcast on Mamnou TV, Arabic for prohibited.

Al Shatat included characters portraying Jews speaking of a global Jewish government.

In one scene, an actress playing a diseased prostitute in a European brothel run by a Jewish madam speaks of her desire to infect non—Jews.

The series was based on the The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Jordanian officials remained tight—lipped on the ban, apparently to avoid agitating a public opinion here already frustrated with Israel's peace policies.

Eric Schwappach  10 31 05