A Sister Souljah moment

I have been reading the internet debate about Miers. I'm not sure I agree with Lifson but I don't agree with the NRO folks either. What the people at NRO don't realize is that the Republicans have gotten control of Congress and the presidency because they are seen as more central than the Democrats.

As long as Michael Moore, Cindy Sheehan, and Howard Dean (not to mention Al Sharpton), are the public face of the party, the Republicans are somewhat immune to being perceived as too far right. But Bush is not really in a position to have a knock down drag out fight over this nomination.

What's more, Bush isn't that conservative. He is moderate on social issues that are terribly important to the folks at the Corner. But most Americans are also moderate on these issues, and until the public moves to the NRO positions — no stem cells, no abortions, no gay marriage — it will be difficult to pursuade Congress to confirm a justice who wants to legislate these positions from the Supreme Court.

In some respects this nomination is a Sister Souljah moment for Bush. The truth is the conservatives have no place else to go. After feeling betrayed are they going to turn to Charles Schumer?
 
It's an interesting issue. Roberts was so obviously qualified that anyone they sent up after him was going to look weak by comparison. But the hearings will give us a better idea of whether Miers is a good choice.

Jonathan Cohen   10 06 05

I have been reading the internet debate about Miers. I'm not sure I agree with Lifson but I don't agree with the NRO folks either. What the people at NRO don't realize is that the Republicans have gotten control of Congress and the presidency because they are seen as more central than the Democrats.

As long as Michael Moore, Cindy Sheehan, and Howard Dean (not to mention Al Sharpton), are the public face of the party, the Republicans are somewhat immune to being perceived as too far right. But Bush is not really in a position to have a knock down drag out fight over this nomination.

What's more, Bush isn't that conservative. He is moderate on social issues that are terribly important to the folks at the Corner. But most Americans are also moderate on these issues, and until the public moves to the NRO positions — no stem cells, no abortions, no gay marriage — it will be difficult to pursuade Congress to confirm a justice who wants to legislate these positions from the Supreme Court.

In some respects this nomination is a Sister Souljah moment for Bush. The truth is the conservatives have no place else to go. After feeling betrayed are they going to turn to Charles Schumer?
 
It's an interesting issue. Roberts was so obviously qualified that anyone they sent up after him was going to look weak by comparison. But the hearings will give us a better idea of whether Miers is a good choice.

Jonathan Cohen   10 06 05