Have they no shame?

By

This group of anti—war letters were received by soldiers in Iraq from grade school students in Park Slope (Brooklyn, NY), one of the most liberal—left neighborhoods in NY. Despite the denials of negative intent by the teacher, apparently the left now is trying another avenue to attack our soldiers' morale, having failed in the 2004 elections. This story — and its reaction — isn't finished yet.

Jack Kemp   2 21 05
(not the ex—congressman)

SOLDIER STUNNED BY LETTER KIDS' RANTS

Pfc. Rob Jacobs of New Jersey said he was initially ecstatic to get a package of letters from sixth—graders at JHS 51 in Park Slope last month at his base 10 miles from the North Korea border. That changed when he opened the envelope and found missives strewn with politically charged rhetoric, vicious accusations and demoralizing predictions that only a handful of soldiers would leave the Iraq war alive.

"It's hard enough for soldiers to deal with being away from their families, they don't need to be getting letters like this," Jacobs, 20, said in a phone interview from his base at Camp Casey.

"If they don't have anything nice to say, they might as well not say anything at all."

This group of anti—war letters were received by soldiers in Iraq from grade school students in Park Slope (Brooklyn, NY), one of the most liberal—left neighborhoods in NY. Despite the denials of negative intent by the teacher, apparently the left now is trying another avenue to attack our soldiers' morale, having failed in the 2004 elections. This story — and its reaction — isn't finished yet.

Jack Kemp   2 21 05
(not the ex—congressman)

SOLDIER STUNNED BY LETTER KIDS' RANTS

Pfc. Rob Jacobs of New Jersey said he was initially ecstatic to get a package of letters from sixth—graders at JHS 51 in Park Slope last month at his base 10 miles from the North Korea border. That changed when he opened the envelope and found missives strewn with politically charged rhetoric, vicious accusations and demoralizing predictions that only a handful of soldiers would leave the Iraq war alive.

"It's hard enough for soldiers to deal with being away from their families, they don't need to be getting letters like this," Jacobs, 20, said in a phone interview from his base at Camp Casey.

"If they don't have anything nice to say, they might as well not say anything at all."