We Are in Good Hands with Trump

For those of you pearl-clutchers on the right who haven't understood why Donald Trump is president-elect, here it is.  The man known for the phrase "you're fired" should actually be known for another talent, which is to size up people well and hire them to get things done well.  He's not just pretty good; it's a gift that needs to be seen for what it is, which is simple excellence in a time of mediocrity.

One of the principles in The Art of the Deal that Trump speaks of as being of utmost importance is having good instincts, and cultivating the use of them.  It's been the key to his success in business, in television, and now in his short career as a politician.  Newt Gingrich called him the fastest learner about politics he had ever seen, but it goes deeper than that.  His gift of hiring people at the right time is the key to his ascendance.

We know that Trump has hired well during his business career.  You don't do as well as he has without knowing how to hire and cultivate people.  It's a given: in his business, he hired brilliantly. 

You can see it in the campaign in two ways.  First, look at the three different people he hired as his campaign managers during different segments of his campaign.  Second, look at the advisers he has brought on to his team, those he trusted to help guide him through the minefields of an arena he knew little about.

His first campaign manager was Corey Lewandowski, a man well acquainted with the hardball side of politics.  He has been described as hard charging, tough, willing to mix it up, and willing to get personal.  Trump hired him because he knew that the early part of his campaign would be rough and tumble, knew that he had to take on an established GOP who had stacked the deck with a huge field of fairly well known candidates.  In order to stand out, he had to show his own issues as important and accentuate them with his own bombastic side, his own trait of flamboyance.  He knew that Lewandowski would help him do that.

The early part of his campaign was known for the non-P.C. Trump, the man who would tell it like it is, the man who would say things others wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole.  He instantly connected with the Republican base, a base who felt totally abandoned by its own party (rightfully so), and Lewandowski fueled this image.  He cemented the image of the tough guy, the brawler, the street fighter, the man who would take on the establishment of the GOP.  It was a brilliant strategy,  and it propelled him to the top of the polls, to a lead he would never relinquish.  The constant propagation of that image made his supporters loyal, and ready to fight for him, eager to find a kindred spirit who would throw out those in their party who had betrayed them.

In the latter part of the primary campaign, something different and new became necessary.  The GOP establishment was trying to steal his popular mandate through delegate manipulation and was scheming in ways to deny him, this bombastic, know-nothing outsider, the nomination.  The #NeverTrumps were doing their best to take away his popular mandate.  A new path needed to be struck, so Trump hired a man well acquainted with party rules, a man who knew how to finish the deal.  This man was Paul Manafort.

It was a perfect hire for what lay ahead.  Manafort was a man of the establishment, a man with influence and creds with the GOP.  Here was a man who knew how to latch onto and keep delegates in line, a man who understood how to steer through the rules of the GOP convention, a man who had experience going way back to Ronald Reagan.  We now know how Trump avoided the traps set at the end – the desperation of the Cruz and Kasich campaigns, the desperation of the #NeverTrumps, and the desperation of the GOP elites who hated him so thoroughly.  It was through the steady hand of Paul Manafort that he finalized the campaign and coasted to the final delegate vote that gave him the nomination.

After the conventions, once again, a change was necessary.  In order to beat the Clinton-media complex, it would take an extraordinary effort, and the person to hire needed clear vision and clear understanding of the political landscape – one who could overcome the juggernaut of the Clinton machine that was colluding with the mainstream media.  

Trump's hire: Kellyanne Conway.  Her mission: Maintain the outsider, change agent persona.  Outline policy positions that would consolidate the conservative base.  Fight the #NeverTrumps on the left flank and make them insignificant.  Bring in the Reagan Democrats and the first-time voters.  Show the public that Trump is a good alternative to a corrupt and dishonest establishment.  Show the public just how corrupt our media are.

As we all know now, she was superb and did all of the above.  Much more should be said about her part.  She was an incredible force and deserves all the applause she gets. 

Beyond the campaign managers, we had the hiring of his first full political partner: Mike Pence.  Pence was a subtly dazzling choice.  His temperament is unflappable, his conservative creds hard to challenge, and, as I predicted, he would help put the entire Midwest in play for Trump.  His debate performance against the rudeness of Tim Kaine was inspiring, and it let the nation (the ones who didn't already know) see that Trump had chosen a great running mate, whereas Hillary Clinton for all her so-called smarts had not done very well with her choice.  Here was a man who was fully capable of engaging where he was needed from day one, someone who could credibly take command if the unthinkable happened.

Trump's advisers and potential cabinet are every bit as competent as those mentioned earlier.  Rudy Giuliani, Newt Gingrich, General Flynn, Sheriff David Clarke, Dr. Ben Carson, Reince Priebus, and Sarah Palin are all close advisers and will likely play major roles in his administration.  Each one has incredible expertise in areas fundamental to the success of our country.  That they are his close advisers and perhaps cabinet members says one thing: Trump knows how to hire.  He knows who will help reset the American dream.  He knows what needs to get done.

The obvious take on this – and I say this for all the #NeverTrumps, the naysayers, and anyone who might be nervous about what to expect from a Trump administration – is that Trump's track record of hiring the right people to get a job done well, people who excel, tells us that the country will be in the best of hands.  Whoever will be in his administration will excel.  This could be the finest assembly of talent and likely outcomes for the country since Ronald Reagan. 

Unlike during the past eight years, we can be assured that those he hires will be the best and will do their best.  Be confident, America – the wheel is turning your way.  When he says "You're hired!," you can be assured that these people will do well for our country.

For those of you pearl-clutchers on the right who haven't understood why Donald Trump is president-elect, here it is.  The man known for the phrase "you're fired" should actually be known for another talent, which is to size up people well and hire them to get things done well.  He's not just pretty good; it's a gift that needs to be seen for what it is, which is simple excellence in a time of mediocrity.

One of the principles in The Art of the Deal that Trump speaks of as being of utmost importance is having good instincts, and cultivating the use of them.  It's been the key to his success in business, in television, and now in his short career as a politician.  Newt Gingrich called him the fastest learner about politics he had ever seen, but it goes deeper than that.  His gift of hiring people at the right time is the key to his ascendance.

We know that Trump has hired well during his business career.  You don't do as well as he has without knowing how to hire and cultivate people.  It's a given: in his business, he hired brilliantly. 

You can see it in the campaign in two ways.  First, look at the three different people he hired as his campaign managers during different segments of his campaign.  Second, look at the advisers he has brought on to his team, those he trusted to help guide him through the minefields of an arena he knew little about.

His first campaign manager was Corey Lewandowski, a man well acquainted with the hardball side of politics.  He has been described as hard charging, tough, willing to mix it up, and willing to get personal.  Trump hired him because he knew that the early part of his campaign would be rough and tumble, knew that he had to take on an established GOP who had stacked the deck with a huge field of fairly well known candidates.  In order to stand out, he had to show his own issues as important and accentuate them with his own bombastic side, his own trait of flamboyance.  He knew that Lewandowski would help him do that.

The early part of his campaign was known for the non-P.C. Trump, the man who would tell it like it is, the man who would say things others wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole.  He instantly connected with the Republican base, a base who felt totally abandoned by its own party (rightfully so), and Lewandowski fueled this image.  He cemented the image of the tough guy, the brawler, the street fighter, the man who would take on the establishment of the GOP.  It was a brilliant strategy,  and it propelled him to the top of the polls, to a lead he would never relinquish.  The constant propagation of that image made his supporters loyal, and ready to fight for him, eager to find a kindred spirit who would throw out those in their party who had betrayed them.

In the latter part of the primary campaign, something different and new became necessary.  The GOP establishment was trying to steal his popular mandate through delegate manipulation and was scheming in ways to deny him, this bombastic, know-nothing outsider, the nomination.  The #NeverTrumps were doing their best to take away his popular mandate.  A new path needed to be struck, so Trump hired a man well acquainted with party rules, a man who knew how to finish the deal.  This man was Paul Manafort.

It was a perfect hire for what lay ahead.  Manafort was a man of the establishment, a man with influence and creds with the GOP.  Here was a man who knew how to latch onto and keep delegates in line, a man who understood how to steer through the rules of the GOP convention, a man who had experience going way back to Ronald Reagan.  We now know how Trump avoided the traps set at the end – the desperation of the Cruz and Kasich campaigns, the desperation of the #NeverTrumps, and the desperation of the GOP elites who hated him so thoroughly.  It was through the steady hand of Paul Manafort that he finalized the campaign and coasted to the final delegate vote that gave him the nomination.

After the conventions, once again, a change was necessary.  In order to beat the Clinton-media complex, it would take an extraordinary effort, and the person to hire needed clear vision and clear understanding of the political landscape – one who could overcome the juggernaut of the Clinton machine that was colluding with the mainstream media.  

Trump's hire: Kellyanne Conway.  Her mission: Maintain the outsider, change agent persona.  Outline policy positions that would consolidate the conservative base.  Fight the #NeverTrumps on the left flank and make them insignificant.  Bring in the Reagan Democrats and the first-time voters.  Show the public that Trump is a good alternative to a corrupt and dishonest establishment.  Show the public just how corrupt our media are.

As we all know now, she was superb and did all of the above.  Much more should be said about her part.  She was an incredible force and deserves all the applause she gets. 

Beyond the campaign managers, we had the hiring of his first full political partner: Mike Pence.  Pence was a subtly dazzling choice.  His temperament is unflappable, his conservative creds hard to challenge, and, as I predicted, he would help put the entire Midwest in play for Trump.  His debate performance against the rudeness of Tim Kaine was inspiring, and it let the nation (the ones who didn't already know) see that Trump had chosen a great running mate, whereas Hillary Clinton for all her so-called smarts had not done very well with her choice.  Here was a man who was fully capable of engaging where he was needed from day one, someone who could credibly take command if the unthinkable happened.

Trump's advisers and potential cabinet are every bit as competent as those mentioned earlier.  Rudy Giuliani, Newt Gingrich, General Flynn, Sheriff David Clarke, Dr. Ben Carson, Reince Priebus, and Sarah Palin are all close advisers and will likely play major roles in his administration.  Each one has incredible expertise in areas fundamental to the success of our country.  That they are his close advisers and perhaps cabinet members says one thing: Trump knows how to hire.  He knows who will help reset the American dream.  He knows what needs to get done.

The obvious take on this – and I say this for all the #NeverTrumps, the naysayers, and anyone who might be nervous about what to expect from a Trump administration – is that Trump's track record of hiring the right people to get a job done well, people who excel, tells us that the country will be in the best of hands.  Whoever will be in his administration will excel.  This could be the finest assembly of talent and likely outcomes for the country since Ronald Reagan. 

Unlike during the past eight years, we can be assured that those he hires will be the best and will do their best.  Be confident, America – the wheel is turning your way.  When he says "You're hired!," you can be assured that these people will do well for our country.