Can You Even Begin to Imagine?

Can you even begin to imagine what President-Elect Donald Trump now can do to make America great again?

He has the White House.

He has a clear mandate for his entire agenda because he explicitly articulated every one of his leadership priorities, even if he sometimes was incomplete on details.

Trump has the House solidly.

He has approximately ten Democrat senators terrified because they come up for re-election in two years and are in GOP-friendly states.  There's Joe Donnelly in Indiana, which just sent Evan Bayh back to lobbying in Washington.  There's Claire McCaskill of Missouri, a state that just re-elected Roy Blunt and changed governors from Democrat to Republican.  There's Jon Tester of Montana – it does not get redder than Montana.  There's Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota; Sherrod Brown of Ohio, which just gave Rob Portman a twenty-plus-point mandate; and Joe Manchin.  Others like Bill Nelson in Florida and Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin are vulnerable.  These senators will be running scared these next two years.  (Expect to see much too much of McCaskill on Fox News.)

With the Supreme Court knotted at 4-4, Trump has an immediate vacancy to fill, the seat previously held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.  Meanwhile, Justices Ruth Ginsburg, Anthony Kennedy, and Stephen Breyer all are in their sunset season.

One must assume that IRS commissioner John Koskinen will be deducted from the Internal Revenue Service.  That would open the door for the IRS to investigate the Clinton Foundation in the same way that the New York attorney general investigates Trump operations.  Trump also can launch an investigation into what exactly Lois Lerner did and whether others aided and abetted her.  In addition, Trump now can make critical changes to the Tax Code – and that always was Paul Ryan's dream.

With all the tools of government at his back, a President Trump now can cancel all the Obama executive orders as fast as counting "1-2-3."  For the Democrats, it is an inconvenient truth that all the Obama climate agreements and trade agreements and Iran deals that he chose not to present to the Congress as treaties for ratification, but rather enshrined as personal executive orders, now can be neutralized by the incoming executive.

Trump now can secure the border, can build a big beautiful wall with a big door.

He can repeal Obamacare.  Suddenly, men no longer will have to pay for themselves to be covered for pregnancy conditions.  We no longer will have to pay for Sandra Fluke's birth control.  Employers will not have to limit full-time employees to 29-hour employment.  Doctors will stop retiring from practice.  People with coverage will have reasonable insurance deductibles, and their premiums will stop rising forty percent a year.  It will be possible to buy better, cheaper insurance coverage offered in other states.

A President Trump, with a Republican Congress, now can cut off funding to sanctuary cities.  He can drain the swamp that festers in the Eric Holder-Loretta Lynch Justice Department.  He can relieve FBI director James Comey from getting embroiled in political investigations by allowing for the appointment of special investigators to find out what happened in this country during the past eight years of corruption.

He can keep Gitmo open.

He can move America's Israel embassy to that country's capital city, Jerusalem.  All embassies belong in capital cities.  Congress already has passed the enabling legislation.  All he has to do is just do it.

He can ask Rick Perry for the names of those three federal agencies to close down.  As a start, he not only can deal with Common Core, but can begin the process of permanently closing down the entire federal Department of Education and returning that role to the states.

He can send Loretta Lynch home, even arranging for her to catch a flight on an Arizona tarmac, and she can discuss grandchildren and golfing with the TSA as she goes through security.  How do these sound: Attorney General Chris Christie?  Secretary of Homeland Security Rudy Giuliani?  Secretary of State John Bolton?  Secretary of Defense Jeff Sessions?  Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Flynn?  White House Communications Director Kellyanne Conway?  Gotta give Newt something.  Also Reince Priebus, who ultimately stood with him during difficult times.  And Dr. Ben Carson.  Maybe make Newt the ambassador to the United Nations.  He deserves it, the U.N. deserves it, and Megyn Kelly deserves it.

As a cautionary, Trump may enter office with one huge headache.  If the Fed finally starts to allow interest rates to rise according to market forces, as it soon must, the impact on the $19-trillion debt will be devastating and will force major budget decisions.  So that will be tough and could ruin some of his infrastructure and other spending plans.  However, it also will chasten Republicans to avoid building bridges to nowhere.  This time, the GOP had better get it right.

There is reason to be deeply hopeful that, with the election concluded, the rhetoric on all sides will soften, the intensity of feelings will diminish, and many people will give the new president a few weeks' "honeymoon" to see what he can do.  He began beautifully with the acceptance speech he made, praising Hillary for her lifetime of service and congratulating her and her team for the contest they made.  He did not mean a word of it, nor did he have to.  It was a touch of class.

His proven instincts and experience as a lifetime deal-maker hopefully will lead him to find ways to work productively with Congress and to avoid unnecessary bipartisan animus now that he has won his prize.  Naturally, a President Trump will advance agenda item steps that inevitably will cause disagreements.  If he reverses executive orders, upends the Iran Deal, repeals Obamacare, etc., he will face opposition.  There is no avoiding that. 

Nevertheless, a President Trump with a supportive Congress and judiciary potentially may do a great job.  The public exposures of his seamier past hopefully have humbled him.  He surely does not want to have that side of his past revived and made his legacy.  He surely does not want to lose this wife or to lose the respect of his beautiful children any further.  With Trump. there are bound to be painful lapses because, at age 70, he is what he is – but he also will start focusing, soon enough, on building a record that can get him re-elected.  That swamp cannot be drained in less than a decade.  Hopefully he also will use a serious portion of the four years to extend serious outreach efforts to black Americans and Latinos, to women, and to other groups who have been used and manipulated by Democrats, Hollywood , the mainstream media, and the left for half a century.  Non-Caucasians will come to see that the media lied about him, that he is not that racist misogynist that the racists and misogynists in the Democratic Party and the media painted him as being.  And hopefully he will be a president who avoids getting enmeshed in every local imbroglio, from  Trayvon Martin to an arrest of a man thought to be breaking into a home.

There is reason to hope that so much of Donald Trump's nonsense this past year – Little Marco, Lyin' Ted, Low Energy Jeb! – was part of his Brooklyn-street-smart strategy for getting to the front of the pack.  Now that he is there, he has time to realize that he no longer has to street-fight.  He now has the prize.  He will be surrounded by teams of intelligent people who will offer him guidance.  There is reason to hope that, barring unexpected world crises, he will surprise many people by governing wisely and sensibly.  And if crises arise, he may prove exactly the commander in chief needed.

Can you even begin to imagine what President-Elect Donald Trump now can do to make America great again?

He has the White House.

He has a clear mandate for his entire agenda because he explicitly articulated every one of his leadership priorities, even if he sometimes was incomplete on details.

He has 52 United States senators.  He may have lost Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, but next month's Louisiana Senate runoff will net him the 52nd Republican.  He also may find that West Virginia 's Joe Manchin switches parties in the next year, like a reverse Arlen Specter, because Barack Obama, the transformative president, has transformed West Virginia from a Democrat stronghold into one of the reddest states in America.  Manchin may be figuring out that his political career is finished in two years if he runs as a Democrat against a pro-coal, pro-energy Trump. 

Trump has the House solidly.

He has approximately ten Democrat senators terrified because they come up for re-election in two years and are in GOP-friendly states.  There's Joe Donnelly in Indiana, which just sent Evan Bayh back to lobbying in Washington.  There's Claire McCaskill of Missouri, a state that just re-elected Roy Blunt and changed governors from Democrat to Republican.  There's Jon Tester of Montana – it does not get redder than Montana.  There's Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota; Sherrod Brown of Ohio, which just gave Rob Portman a twenty-plus-point mandate; and Joe Manchin.  Others like Bill Nelson in Florida and Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin are vulnerable.  These senators will be running scared these next two years.  (Expect to see much too much of McCaskill on Fox News.)

With the Supreme Court knotted at 4-4, Trump has an immediate vacancy to fill, the seat previously held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.  Meanwhile, Justices Ruth Ginsburg, Anthony Kennedy, and Stephen Breyer all are in their sunset season.

One must assume that IRS commissioner John Koskinen will be deducted from the Internal Revenue Service.  That would open the door for the IRS to investigate the Clinton Foundation in the same way that the New York attorney general investigates Trump operations.  Trump also can launch an investigation into what exactly Lois Lerner did and whether others aided and abetted her.  In addition, Trump now can make critical changes to the Tax Code – and that always was Paul Ryan's dream.

With all the tools of government at his back, a President Trump now can cancel all the Obama executive orders as fast as counting "1-2-3."  For the Democrats, it is an inconvenient truth that all the Obama climate agreements and trade agreements and Iran deals that he chose not to present to the Congress as treaties for ratification, but rather enshrined as personal executive orders, now can be neutralized by the incoming executive.

Trump now can secure the border, can build a big beautiful wall with a big door.

He can repeal Obamacare.  Suddenly, men no longer will have to pay for themselves to be covered for pregnancy conditions.  We no longer will have to pay for Sandra Fluke's birth control.  Employers will not have to limit full-time employees to 29-hour employment.  Doctors will stop retiring from practice.  People with coverage will have reasonable insurance deductibles, and their premiums will stop rising forty percent a year.  It will be possible to buy better, cheaper insurance coverage offered in other states.

A President Trump, with a Republican Congress, now can cut off funding to sanctuary cities.  He can drain the swamp that festers in the Eric Holder-Loretta Lynch Justice Department.  He can relieve FBI director James Comey from getting embroiled in political investigations by allowing for the appointment of special investigators to find out what happened in this country during the past eight years of corruption.

He can keep Gitmo open.

He can move America's Israel embassy to that country's capital city, Jerusalem.  All embassies belong in capital cities.  Congress already has passed the enabling legislation.  All he has to do is just do it.

He can ask Rick Perry for the names of those three federal agencies to close down.  As a start, he not only can deal with Common Core, but can begin the process of permanently closing down the entire federal Department of Education and returning that role to the states.

He can send Loretta Lynch home, even arranging for her to catch a flight on an Arizona tarmac, and she can discuss grandchildren and golfing with the TSA as she goes through security.  How do these sound: Attorney General Chris Christie?  Secretary of Homeland Security Rudy Giuliani?  Secretary of State John Bolton?  Secretary of Defense Jeff Sessions?  Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Flynn?  White House Communications Director Kellyanne Conway?  Gotta give Newt something.  Also Reince Priebus, who ultimately stood with him during difficult times.  And Dr. Ben Carson.  Maybe make Newt the ambassador to the United Nations.  He deserves it, the U.N. deserves it, and Megyn Kelly deserves it.

As a cautionary, Trump may enter office with one huge headache.  If the Fed finally starts to allow interest rates to rise according to market forces, as it soon must, the impact on the $19-trillion debt will be devastating and will force major budget decisions.  So that will be tough and could ruin some of his infrastructure and other spending plans.  However, it also will chasten Republicans to avoid building bridges to nowhere.  This time, the GOP had better get it right.

There is reason to be deeply hopeful that, with the election concluded, the rhetoric on all sides will soften, the intensity of feelings will diminish, and many people will give the new president a few weeks' "honeymoon" to see what he can do.  He began beautifully with the acceptance speech he made, praising Hillary for her lifetime of service and congratulating her and her team for the contest they made.  He did not mean a word of it, nor did he have to.  It was a touch of class.

His proven instincts and experience as a lifetime deal-maker hopefully will lead him to find ways to work productively with Congress and to avoid unnecessary bipartisan animus now that he has won his prize.  Naturally, a President Trump will advance agenda item steps that inevitably will cause disagreements.  If he reverses executive orders, upends the Iran Deal, repeals Obamacare, etc., he will face opposition.  There is no avoiding that. 

Nevertheless, a President Trump with a supportive Congress and judiciary potentially may do a great job.  The public exposures of his seamier past hopefully have humbled him.  He surely does not want to have that side of his past revived and made his legacy.  He surely does not want to lose this wife or to lose the respect of his beautiful children any further.  With Trump. there are bound to be painful lapses because, at age 70, he is what he is – but he also will start focusing, soon enough, on building a record that can get him re-elected.  That swamp cannot be drained in less than a decade.  Hopefully he also will use a serious portion of the four years to extend serious outreach efforts to black Americans and Latinos, to women, and to other groups who have been used and manipulated by Democrats, Hollywood , the mainstream media, and the left for half a century.  Non-Caucasians will come to see that the media lied about him, that he is not that racist misogynist that the racists and misogynists in the Democratic Party and the media painted him as being.  And hopefully he will be a president who avoids getting enmeshed in every local imbroglio, from  Trayvon Martin to an arrest of a man thought to be breaking into a home.

There is reason to hope that so much of Donald Trump's nonsense this past year – Little Marco, Lyin' Ted, Low Energy Jeb! – was part of his Brooklyn-street-smart strategy for getting to the front of the pack.  Now that he is there, he has time to realize that he no longer has to street-fight.  He now has the prize.  He will be surrounded by teams of intelligent people who will offer him guidance.  There is reason to hope that, barring unexpected world crises, he will surprise many people by governing wisely and sensibly.  And if crises arise, he may prove exactly the commander in chief needed.