Trump Is Correct: 30 to 40 Million Illegals Can Be Deported

Donald Trump's plan to deport the 30 to 40 million illegal alien invaders living in America was met with howls of anguish from the left and legacy right.  But the plan is eminently doable.

The first thing to recognize is that the illegal alien problem arose because of the 1987 Reagan Amnesty nearly 30 years ago.  By some estimates, up to 40 million people have entered the USA illegally since that time, so encouraging them to leave may take an extended period of time as well.  With time, many concerns from the left about breaking up families and leaving children crying alone in the streets can be humanely and empathetically addressed, thus negating any moral arguments of cruelty to the families of illegals.  

Somehow, the left and corporatist right have come to believe that our country would collapse without illegal immigration and open borders.  We should remind those bleeding hearts who support the invasion of our country by third-worlders that, for example, fresh produce somehow made its way to market before 1987 without illegals living here.  Note also that countries with strict immigration policies and zero illegal immigration enjoy ample supplies of fruits and vegetables.  Since produce appears to be readily available, just what is this Lettuce Anxiety all about, anyway?  Why does America, out of all the countries in the world, require 30 to 40 million illegals in our country to ensure that we have salads to eat?  Nobody else does.

In answer to the liberal argument that we simply cannot deport 30 to 40 million people from a logistics standpoint, we should point out that America is the land of mobility.  Using accurate data provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, we find that 35.7 million people in America moved in 2014, or 11.5% of the population.  That means 35+ million men, women, children, and families picked up stakes and moved to a new home in the period of one year alone.  Tens of millions of homes were sold, tens of millions of schools got changed, as 35+ million people packed themselves into cars, trucks, buses, planes, boats, and trains and headed to some New Destination.  Of these 35+ million, we also learn that nearly 2 million were overseas movers, meaning passports, work visas, customs, immigration, and international travel.  Somehow deporting the 40 million illegal aliens, most of whom live in California and states bordering Mexico, does not seem like such a logistical nightmare when viewed in this light. 

And what help they could get!  Our broken universities are graduating thousands of mindless liberal do-gooders eager to help the oppressed…and who is more oppressed than illegal aliens (that's sarcasm)?  Given the ample time discussed earlier, and surrounded by clouds of young bleeding-heart social workers, the illegals couldn't possibly encounter any family problems relocating south of the border.  That is just liberal scare-mongering. 

And then there is the robotics argument. Increasingly, experts predict that robots and A.I. will take over much of our work, putting millions of Americans, beginning with those who perform manual work, out of a job.  Why, then, do we need illegal aliens if their jobs are rapidly disappearing in a cloud of machine oil?

At this point, liberals may whine that if we export the jobless back to their home countries, it will cause "social problems" there. First that is not America's fault or America's problem.  Second, these countries should carefully consider China's model of development.  Starting with low-wage jobs, China built a growth economy based upon attracting foreign businesses.  Perhaps the affected countries could agree that living-wage assembly jobs are the first order of business on the ladder to personal and societal success.  With logistics and security advantages as well, why can't these starter jobs be encouraged to migrate from China to Central and South America? 

The "social problem" argument vaporizes when we realize it is simply another example of liberal double-talk.  Mexico, where most illegals originate, invites American retirees and tourists with siren songs of warm beaches, top-notch medical care, luxurious accommodations, social tranquility, exciting things to do, and plentiful amenities.  At the same time, they tell our State Department that their country is a crumbling narco-state and that America is their only "safety valve" for illegal alien troublemakers.  It cannot be both and is probably neither.  

The left and legacy right have demagogued the issue of illegal immigration for too long.  We must confidently take the moral high ground, clearly present the facts, provide positive examples, and argue effectively for the future.  When approached at in this manner, the problem of illegal immigration, the centerpiece of Donald Trump's presidential bid, yields to practical, Trump-centric solutions.

Donald Trump's plan to deport the 30 to 40 million illegal alien invaders living in America was met with howls of anguish from the left and legacy right.  But the plan is eminently doable.

The first thing to recognize is that the illegal alien problem arose because of the 1987 Reagan Amnesty nearly 30 years ago.  By some estimates, up to 40 million people have entered the USA illegally since that time, so encouraging them to leave may take an extended period of time as well.  With time, many concerns from the left about breaking up families and leaving children crying alone in the streets can be humanely and empathetically addressed, thus negating any moral arguments of cruelty to the families of illegals.  

Somehow, the left and corporatist right have come to believe that our country would collapse without illegal immigration and open borders.  We should remind those bleeding hearts who support the invasion of our country by third-worlders that, for example, fresh produce somehow made its way to market before 1987 without illegals living here.  Note also that countries with strict immigration policies and zero illegal immigration enjoy ample supplies of fruits and vegetables.  Since produce appears to be readily available, just what is this Lettuce Anxiety all about, anyway?  Why does America, out of all the countries in the world, require 30 to 40 million illegals in our country to ensure that we have salads to eat?  Nobody else does.

In answer to the liberal argument that we simply cannot deport 30 to 40 million people from a logistics standpoint, we should point out that America is the land of mobility.  Using accurate data provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, we find that 35.7 million people in America moved in 2014, or 11.5% of the population.  That means 35+ million men, women, children, and families picked up stakes and moved to a new home in the period of one year alone.  Tens of millions of homes were sold, tens of millions of schools got changed, as 35+ million people packed themselves into cars, trucks, buses, planes, boats, and trains and headed to some New Destination.  Of these 35+ million, we also learn that nearly 2 million were overseas movers, meaning passports, work visas, customs, immigration, and international travel.  Somehow deporting the 40 million illegal aliens, most of whom live in California and states bordering Mexico, does not seem like such a logistical nightmare when viewed in this light. 

And what help they could get!  Our broken universities are graduating thousands of mindless liberal do-gooders eager to help the oppressed…and who is more oppressed than illegal aliens (that's sarcasm)?  Given the ample time discussed earlier, and surrounded by clouds of young bleeding-heart social workers, the illegals couldn't possibly encounter any family problems relocating south of the border.  That is just liberal scare-mongering. 

And then there is the robotics argument. Increasingly, experts predict that robots and A.I. will take over much of our work, putting millions of Americans, beginning with those who perform manual work, out of a job.  Why, then, do we need illegal aliens if their jobs are rapidly disappearing in a cloud of machine oil?

At this point, liberals may whine that if we export the jobless back to their home countries, it will cause "social problems" there. First that is not America's fault or America's problem.  Second, these countries should carefully consider China's model of development.  Starting with low-wage jobs, China built a growth economy based upon attracting foreign businesses.  Perhaps the affected countries could agree that living-wage assembly jobs are the first order of business on the ladder to personal and societal success.  With logistics and security advantages as well, why can't these starter jobs be encouraged to migrate from China to Central and South America? 

The "social problem" argument vaporizes when we realize it is simply another example of liberal double-talk.  Mexico, where most illegals originate, invites American retirees and tourists with siren songs of warm beaches, top-notch medical care, luxurious accommodations, social tranquility, exciting things to do, and plentiful amenities.  At the same time, they tell our State Department that their country is a crumbling narco-state and that America is their only "safety valve" for illegal alien troublemakers.  It cannot be both and is probably neither.  

The left and legacy right have demagogued the issue of illegal immigration for too long.  We must confidently take the moral high ground, clearly present the facts, provide positive examples, and argue effectively for the future.  When approached at in this manner, the problem of illegal immigration, the centerpiece of Donald Trump's presidential bid, yields to practical, Trump-centric solutions.