Learning from the Debates

One hundred million people watched the last debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.  For the next debate, Mr. Trump should learn from the last one. Instead of speaking of substance, the Clinton campaign went down and dirty, baiting Mr. Trump to spend his precious time defending himself instead of pivoting to her illegal actions. What the Democrats, press, and Hillary Clinton are doing is trying to distract Americans from the real issues.  

ABC/CNN are allowing Americans to vote on some of the questions for the second debate. Currently, the liberals are dominating the question process. For example, one question, “The steps you will take to make America energy independent” had only eight votes, while another question, “What is your plan to combat climate change and build a green economy” had 6600 votes. Because this election is one of the biggest opportunities to change the status quo, showing Washington elitists and the press they cannot dominate who will be president, people need to vote for questions. The strategy is to go to the “most votes category.” 

One question that will never be asked of Hillary is why she should be considered a role model for women considering her hypocritical stance. Republicans/conservatives need to tell a story of a powerful CEO sexually harassing and using his power to flatter a young female intern. The press and liberals will express outrage; yet, when Bill Clinton’s name is mentioned they defend him, dismissing sexual harassment as a "personal issue".

In the next debate, Mr. Trump needs to list how Clinton is a fraud concerning women’s issues. In the 1980s a tape came out where Clinton laughs as she talks of getting a lesser sentence for a rapist on a technicality. The victim accuses her of being a hypocrite for championing women's rights after helping her attacker find a loophole in the case.

In 1998 she called Monica Lewinsky a “narcissistic loony toon.”  Lewinsky wrote, “Hillary Clinton wanted it on record that she was lashing out at her husband’s mistress. She may have faulted her husband for being inappropriate, but I find her impulse to blame the woman, not only me, but herself, troubling.”

Fast-forward to the primary campaign where she stood on the stage when her surrogate, Madeline Albright said, “There's a special place in hell for women who don't help other women.”

Hillary Clinton’s State Department paid men $16,000 more on average in annual salary than women, according to data from the Office of Personnel Management, while the Clinton Foundation pays female executives 38 percent less than male counterparts.

Beyond the women’s issue Mr. Trump needs to discuss more about his policies. American Thinker interviewed one of his national security advisors, Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who served as the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency and wrote the book, The Field Of Fight; one of his economic advisors, Kathleen Hartnett White, who was the former chairperson and commissioner of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and is author of Fueling Freedom: The Mad War on Energy; as well as Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the former Secretary-General of NATO, Prime Minister of Denmark, who has a recently published book The Will To Lead.

During the last debate, Hillary Clinton loved to make generalizations that have no way of being fact checked. She claimed a number of world leaders are worried about Mr. Trump becoming president. But Mr. Rasmussen, when asked by American Thinker, if he feels leaders overseas can work with either candidate, replied, “The United States is such an important player that world leaders can work with whoever might be elected. In Europe, we hope that whoever gets elected this November will understand the importance of American global leadership. The next U.S. president must lead from the front and not retreat from world affairs, otherwise the vacuum will be filled by the bad guys.”

Michael Flynn agrees and points out that countries considered close allies are questioning America’s capability concerning the rise of radical Islam, Russia, and China. In speaking of ISIS he wants Americans to understand Mr. Trump has a vision, but should not give away specific tactics, procedures, and techniques. “Donald Trump has outlined on his website and in many speeches the four components of his national security plan: military, cyber, financial, and psychological. He has said he will speak with his advisors and come out with a specific plan to defeat ISIS within thirty days after being sworn in as president. We are not winning, but are losing this war.  Just look at the number of countries this enemy is operating in, with attacks in at least 22 countries.”

When asked about the reports of mustard gas being used by ISIS in Iraq, he wonders why it was not brought up as a question in the first debate, “especially since this is a major concern, an enemy that possess a chemical capability. If they used it in Iraq and Syria could they extract it out of there?  We know they have the intention and capability. If they used it that should concern every American.”

According to Flynn, one of the top national security issues is America’s national debt. He hopes that Mr. Trump continues to talk about the bubble economy, as he did when Trump dominated the first forty minutes of the debate. “Most people don’t understand the real threat of Chinese currency manipulation. In the world today the currency of choice is the U.S. dollar.  If China had its way it would no longer be that. This would severely damage our ability to be the leader on the world stage.”

Kathleen White also wants Trump to emphasize how he can improve the economy. She believes having “responsible regulatory reforms will help small businesses, overcoming the burden of compliance. Mr. Trumps’ reduction of business tax cuts along with regulatory reform and the low cost of raw materials, because of low energy prices, will help to bring businesses back here. This will help American workers find jobs. He should point out the contrast with Clinton who speaks of public investment to stimulate job creation. These are two words meaning ‘spend taxpayer’s money and give it to favored industries.’”

The other difference she hopes Trump will emphasize is on the energy front. She considers herself a climate change skeptic, but emphasizes, “Our skies are no longer darkened, nor is the exhaust of our car tail pipes black. With emission control technology there are ways to maximize efficiency while minimizing emissions. We should continue to develop technology to improve air quality. New means cleaner. The notion by Clinton that in the next 20, 30, or 40 years we could decarbonize the economy is very dangerous and would affect real economic growth. Taking on coal mining already has affected the economy in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania.”

She further stated, “He should mention how Texas sent 5 to 7 million barrels of oil to England and the Netherlands. Exporting to our allies allows them to be less dependent on Middle Eastern oil. Our ability to export oil across the world could really shift the geopolitical order and allow us to have energy domination. ISIS funds its activities from refineries they have taken over and with their trade on the black market. One of the steps in stopping them is to take away their oil.”

The fate of America is on the line with this election. Hillary Clinton lives in an elite, corrupt Washington bubble. As proof look at how she talks about Americans: calling Trump supporters "deplorable" and Bernie Sanders supporters "basement-dwellers and hopeless." The reason the Clinton campaign is bringing up his tax returns and beauty contests is because they do not want to talk about the real issues. They do not want to speak of ObamaCare, border security, terrorism, and the economy. They are attempting to distract Americans from the real issues facing us today. Why, because she reflects the status quo, while Trump reflects change.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

One hundred million people watched the last debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.  For the next debate, Mr. Trump should learn from the last one. Instead of speaking of substance, the Clinton campaign went down and dirty, baiting Mr. Trump to spend his precious time defending himself instead of pivoting to her illegal actions. What the Democrats, press, and Hillary Clinton are doing is trying to distract Americans from the real issues.  

ABC/CNN are allowing Americans to vote on some of the questions for the second debate. Currently, the liberals are dominating the question process. For example, one question, “The steps you will take to make America energy independent” had only eight votes, while another question, “What is your plan to combat climate change and build a green economy” had 6600 votes. Because this election is one of the biggest opportunities to change the status quo, showing Washington elitists and the press they cannot dominate who will be president, people need to vote for questions. The strategy is to go to the “most votes category.” 

One question that will never be asked of Hillary is why she should be considered a role model for women considering her hypocritical stance. Republicans/conservatives need to tell a story of a powerful CEO sexually harassing and using his power to flatter a young female intern. The press and liberals will express outrage; yet, when Bill Clinton’s name is mentioned they defend him, dismissing sexual harassment as a "personal issue".

In the next debate, Mr. Trump needs to list how Clinton is a fraud concerning women’s issues. In the 1980s a tape came out where Clinton laughs as she talks of getting a lesser sentence for a rapist on a technicality. The victim accuses her of being a hypocrite for championing women's rights after helping her attacker find a loophole in the case.

In 1998 she called Monica Lewinsky a “narcissistic loony toon.”  Lewinsky wrote, “Hillary Clinton wanted it on record that she was lashing out at her husband’s mistress. She may have faulted her husband for being inappropriate, but I find her impulse to blame the woman, not only me, but herself, troubling.”

Fast-forward to the primary campaign where she stood on the stage when her surrogate, Madeline Albright said, “There's a special place in hell for women who don't help other women.”

Hillary Clinton’s State Department paid men $16,000 more on average in annual salary than women, according to data from the Office of Personnel Management, while the Clinton Foundation pays female executives 38 percent less than male counterparts.

Beyond the women’s issue Mr. Trump needs to discuss more about his policies. American Thinker interviewed one of his national security advisors, Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who served as the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency and wrote the book, The Field Of Fight; one of his economic advisors, Kathleen Hartnett White, who was the former chairperson and commissioner of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and is author of Fueling Freedom: The Mad War on Energy; as well as Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the former Secretary-General of NATO, Prime Minister of Denmark, who has a recently published book The Will To Lead.

During the last debate, Hillary Clinton loved to make generalizations that have no way of being fact checked. She claimed a number of world leaders are worried about Mr. Trump becoming president. But Mr. Rasmussen, when asked by American Thinker, if he feels leaders overseas can work with either candidate, replied, “The United States is such an important player that world leaders can work with whoever might be elected. In Europe, we hope that whoever gets elected this November will understand the importance of American global leadership. The next U.S. president must lead from the front and not retreat from world affairs, otherwise the vacuum will be filled by the bad guys.”

Michael Flynn agrees and points out that countries considered close allies are questioning America’s capability concerning the rise of radical Islam, Russia, and China. In speaking of ISIS he wants Americans to understand Mr. Trump has a vision, but should not give away specific tactics, procedures, and techniques. “Donald Trump has outlined on his website and in many speeches the four components of his national security plan: military, cyber, financial, and psychological. He has said he will speak with his advisors and come out with a specific plan to defeat ISIS within thirty days after being sworn in as president. We are not winning, but are losing this war.  Just look at the number of countries this enemy is operating in, with attacks in at least 22 countries.”

When asked about the reports of mustard gas being used by ISIS in Iraq, he wonders why it was not brought up as a question in the first debate, “especially since this is a major concern, an enemy that possess a chemical capability. If they used it in Iraq and Syria could they extract it out of there?  We know they have the intention and capability. If they used it that should concern every American.”

According to Flynn, one of the top national security issues is America’s national debt. He hopes that Mr. Trump continues to talk about the bubble economy, as he did when Trump dominated the first forty minutes of the debate. “Most people don’t understand the real threat of Chinese currency manipulation. In the world today the currency of choice is the U.S. dollar.  If China had its way it would no longer be that. This would severely damage our ability to be the leader on the world stage.”

Kathleen White also wants Trump to emphasize how he can improve the economy. She believes having “responsible regulatory reforms will help small businesses, overcoming the burden of compliance. Mr. Trumps’ reduction of business tax cuts along with regulatory reform and the low cost of raw materials, because of low energy prices, will help to bring businesses back here. This will help American workers find jobs. He should point out the contrast with Clinton who speaks of public investment to stimulate job creation. These are two words meaning ‘spend taxpayer’s money and give it to favored industries.’”

The other difference she hopes Trump will emphasize is on the energy front. She considers herself a climate change skeptic, but emphasizes, “Our skies are no longer darkened, nor is the exhaust of our car tail pipes black. With emission control technology there are ways to maximize efficiency while minimizing emissions. We should continue to develop technology to improve air quality. New means cleaner. The notion by Clinton that in the next 20, 30, or 40 years we could decarbonize the economy is very dangerous and would affect real economic growth. Taking on coal mining already has affected the economy in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania.”

She further stated, “He should mention how Texas sent 5 to 7 million barrels of oil to England and the Netherlands. Exporting to our allies allows them to be less dependent on Middle Eastern oil. Our ability to export oil across the world could really shift the geopolitical order and allow us to have energy domination. ISIS funds its activities from refineries they have taken over and with their trade on the black market. One of the steps in stopping them is to take away their oil.”

The fate of America is on the line with this election. Hillary Clinton lives in an elite, corrupt Washington bubble. As proof look at how she talks about Americans: calling Trump supporters "deplorable" and Bernie Sanders supporters "basement-dwellers and hopeless." The reason the Clinton campaign is bringing up his tax returns and beauty contests is because they do not want to talk about the real issues. They do not want to speak of ObamaCare, border security, terrorism, and the economy. They are attempting to distract Americans from the real issues facing us today. Why, because she reflects the status quo, while Trump reflects change.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.