New York Times: Saving Kids from the Last Hetero WASP in America

When the gayest of gay ladies – the New York Times – starts clutching pearls over a "mortifying" Republican debate, it's a bon-bon of hypocrisy too delicious not to be nibbled.  The Times (whose slogan should be "All the sodomy that's fit to print") is actually disturbed because somewhere, somehow, Republicans are having fun.  There's none so moralistic as those who are helping to destroy the most advanced moral code in history.

On March 10, 2016 Sarah Lyall published the puritanical puffery entitled, "The Parent-Child Discussion That So Many Dread: Donald Trump."  One of the pervasive fallacies of post-Judeo-Christian child-rearing is that "discussion" is better for children than teaching moral absolutes and how to rise, sometimes fall, and rise again in moral truth.  In fact, discussion is basically useless.  The emphasis on yakking is a domestic variation on the magical conversation fantasy, that a conversation flecked with glimmering mots justes can solve any problem in the world.  Of course, it can't.  But it is an adaptive fallacy.  For example, the magical conversation delusion helps lefties deny that they lack the courage to risk their dear corporeality defending their nation.

Mrs. Lyall's piece about the dread discussion of The Donald opens in the cozy living room of parents Gary Goyette and Andrea Todd, who watched the March 3 debate with their 10-year-old son, Tommy.  At the exchange between Trump and Rubio, wherein the frontrunner reassured voters that there was "no problem" with a certain part of his anatomy, a horrified Gary said, "'Tommy, you've got to leave – you've got to get out of here.' And Tommy actually got up and ran out of the room."

As they say in Queens..."Puh-leeze, gimme a break."

Among television, computer, and videogames, the average 10-year-old spends hours every day in screen time.  Thanks to the decimation of God-based morality, a movement spearheaded in the pages of the Times, little Tommy has been exposed from birth to hundreds of thousands of explicit words and images far more dehumanizing than anything Donald Trump might say.  It would indeed be dreadful to tell Tommy about even a smattering of the anti-natural and anti-moral philosophy epitomized by the Times.  Little Tommy lives in California, where May 22 is Harvey Milk Day for California schoolchildren.  A parent-child discussion about Harvey Milk's treatment of underage boys might reasonably send Tommy running from the room.

Richard Klin of Stone Ridge, New York is quoted as saying of his eleven-year-old daughter, "I had this impulse to lock her away in an enchanted land where Donald Trump doesn't exist, but you can't."  The Times is a staunch promoter of anti-natural initiatives such as Planned Parenthood and homosexual adoption.  Does Planned Parenthood kill babies and sell their body parts in the enchanted land?  Do gay men purchase babies there?  If young Miss Klin is of a philosophical turn of mind, which the children of Stone Ridge, New York are known to be, she and her dad may discuss the differences between slavery for labor and slavery to meet emotional needs.  Being imaginative, they might note that both kinds of servitude necessitate the radical separation of the captive person from his authentic, natural identity.

According to the article, government schools in wealthy communities continue to brainwash students into left-wing politics while ignoring the realities that confront many Americans.  Kathy Maher, a teacher in Newton, Massachusetts, tells her students to think of Donald Trump as "the crazy old uncle who just says whatever he wants."  Another protectress, she saves students from knowing that most Americans less privileged than their parents cannot find good jobs, and how that destroys lives and communities.  Whatever he does if elected, Donald Trump is focusing on restoring a great nation – not with socialist handouts, but with the opportunity for lawful citizens to work in an economically level playing field.  Students in Newton are not encouraged to consider that that may be why Trump is the front-runner, and not because he is a bully.

Speaking of bullying, the Times is the pinnacle of anti-Christian bullying.  Piquant examples include the 6/29/2015 image of Pope Benedict XVI made of condoms, shortly after their 5/28/16 publication of Christ's mother layered in excrement surrounded by pornography.  These execrations occurred shortly after the Times declined to publish the Charlie Hebdo cartoon images of Mohammed.  Times executive editor Dean Baquet wrote: "Was it hard to deny our readers these images?  Yes, but we still have standards and they involve not running offensive materials."  Trump Derangement Syndrome, left-wing variety, is the frenzied sticking of forks into the last fair-haired, flagrantly heterosexual, sufficiently Protestant candidate left standing in America.

If the Times has its way, there will soon be American toddlers on Georgia-Pacific tracks dressed up for their big photo ops, as in Europe.  Lyall reports a Facebook conversation in the family of Jon Michaud of Maplewood, N.J.  Mr. Michaud is white, and his wife is described as Dominican.  There is no information about whether any members of the Michaud family are illegal aliens.  The article is pure backhand to the forehead, race-baiting melodrama.

"So if Donald Trump becomes president, he's going to bring racism back," he said his 8-year-old had told him. "That means Marcus, Mommy and I will be separated from you because we have darker skin than you do, right?"

(The left insists that racism never left, except to make the point that Republicans are going to bring it back).  Setting aside the implausible literary prowess of this 8-year-old, at this point the evil Trump meme is built, and the Michaud family is dropped from Lyall's article like hot fried plantain.  Has the child been told the truth?  Nobody is going to take you away because your skin appears different from your daddy's.  Do you know what it is to tell a lie?  Many people are in America because they told a lie.  They have stolen America just like stealing candy from a store.  People have to stop stealing America or there will be no America left for anyone.  Love has nothing to do with color; your family is yours to love forever.

There is a beautiful way to tell if discussion is revealing the truth about things.  The truth never crushes the heart.  The truth about every person brings hope, confidence, and possibility.  Truth is God's nickname on the job site.  The truth may disappoint temporarily, but it cannot discourage permanently.  If Donald Trump is an honorable American, that truth will unfold to the benefit of all.  The discovery of who he is will be attained through honesty with ourselves.

Here is a good way to talk to children about the problems of open borders and the ideas of Trump.  Take the child to the front door of your house or apartment.  Show him the  lock and say, "We have to keep this door locked because only people we have invited can come into our house.  If all the people outside could come in here whenever they wanted, it wouldn't be a good place to live anymore.  People who love America are going to build a strong wall like this wall and a big door like this one.  Then friends can come over, and we can also have America for a long, long time."

When the gayest of gay ladies – the New York Times – starts clutching pearls over a "mortifying" Republican debate, it's a bon-bon of hypocrisy too delicious not to be nibbled.  The Times (whose slogan should be "All the sodomy that's fit to print") is actually disturbed because somewhere, somehow, Republicans are having fun.  There's none so moralistic as those who are helping to destroy the most advanced moral code in history.

On March 10, 2016 Sarah Lyall published the puritanical puffery entitled, "The Parent-Child Discussion That So Many Dread: Donald Trump."  One of the pervasive fallacies of post-Judeo-Christian child-rearing is that "discussion" is better for children than teaching moral absolutes and how to rise, sometimes fall, and rise again in moral truth.  In fact, discussion is basically useless.  The emphasis on yakking is a domestic variation on the magical conversation fantasy, that a conversation flecked with glimmering mots justes can solve any problem in the world.  Of course, it can't.  But it is an adaptive fallacy.  For example, the magical conversation delusion helps lefties deny that they lack the courage to risk their dear corporeality defending their nation.

Mrs. Lyall's piece about the dread discussion of The Donald opens in the cozy living room of parents Gary Goyette and Andrea Todd, who watched the March 3 debate with their 10-year-old son, Tommy.  At the exchange between Trump and Rubio, wherein the frontrunner reassured voters that there was "no problem" with a certain part of his anatomy, a horrified Gary said, "'Tommy, you've got to leave – you've got to get out of here.' And Tommy actually got up and ran out of the room."

As they say in Queens..."Puh-leeze, gimme a break."

Among television, computer, and videogames, the average 10-year-old spends hours every day in screen time.  Thanks to the decimation of God-based morality, a movement spearheaded in the pages of the Times, little Tommy has been exposed from birth to hundreds of thousands of explicit words and images far more dehumanizing than anything Donald Trump might say.  It would indeed be dreadful to tell Tommy about even a smattering of the anti-natural and anti-moral philosophy epitomized by the Times.  Little Tommy lives in California, where May 22 is Harvey Milk Day for California schoolchildren.  A parent-child discussion about Harvey Milk's treatment of underage boys might reasonably send Tommy running from the room.

Richard Klin of Stone Ridge, New York is quoted as saying of his eleven-year-old daughter, "I had this impulse to lock her away in an enchanted land where Donald Trump doesn't exist, but you can't."  The Times is a staunch promoter of anti-natural initiatives such as Planned Parenthood and homosexual adoption.  Does Planned Parenthood kill babies and sell their body parts in the enchanted land?  Do gay men purchase babies there?  If young Miss Klin is of a philosophical turn of mind, which the children of Stone Ridge, New York are known to be, she and her dad may discuss the differences between slavery for labor and slavery to meet emotional needs.  Being imaginative, they might note that both kinds of servitude necessitate the radical separation of the captive person from his authentic, natural identity.

According to the article, government schools in wealthy communities continue to brainwash students into left-wing politics while ignoring the realities that confront many Americans.  Kathy Maher, a teacher in Newton, Massachusetts, tells her students to think of Donald Trump as "the crazy old uncle who just says whatever he wants."  Another protectress, she saves students from knowing that most Americans less privileged than their parents cannot find good jobs, and how that destroys lives and communities.  Whatever he does if elected, Donald Trump is focusing on restoring a great nation – not with socialist handouts, but with the opportunity for lawful citizens to work in an economically level playing field.  Students in Newton are not encouraged to consider that that may be why Trump is the front-runner, and not because he is a bully.

Speaking of bullying, the Times is the pinnacle of anti-Christian bullying.  Piquant examples include the 6/29/2015 image of Pope Benedict XVI made of condoms, shortly after their 5/28/16 publication of Christ's mother layered in excrement surrounded by pornography.  These execrations occurred shortly after the Times declined to publish the Charlie Hebdo cartoon images of Mohammed.  Times executive editor Dean Baquet wrote: "Was it hard to deny our readers these images?  Yes, but we still have standards and they involve not running offensive materials."  Trump Derangement Syndrome, left-wing variety, is the frenzied sticking of forks into the last fair-haired, flagrantly heterosexual, sufficiently Protestant candidate left standing in America.

If the Times has its way, there will soon be American toddlers on Georgia-Pacific tracks dressed up for their big photo ops, as in Europe.  Lyall reports a Facebook conversation in the family of Jon Michaud of Maplewood, N.J.  Mr. Michaud is white, and his wife is described as Dominican.  There is no information about whether any members of the Michaud family are illegal aliens.  The article is pure backhand to the forehead, race-baiting melodrama.

"So if Donald Trump becomes president, he's going to bring racism back," he said his 8-year-old had told him. "That means Marcus, Mommy and I will be separated from you because we have darker skin than you do, right?"

(The left insists that racism never left, except to make the point that Republicans are going to bring it back).  Setting aside the implausible literary prowess of this 8-year-old, at this point the evil Trump meme is built, and the Michaud family is dropped from Lyall's article like hot fried plantain.  Has the child been told the truth?  Nobody is going to take you away because your skin appears different from your daddy's.  Do you know what it is to tell a lie?  Many people are in America because they told a lie.  They have stolen America just like stealing candy from a store.  People have to stop stealing America or there will be no America left for anyone.  Love has nothing to do with color; your family is yours to love forever.

There is a beautiful way to tell if discussion is revealing the truth about things.  The truth never crushes the heart.  The truth about every person brings hope, confidence, and possibility.  Truth is God's nickname on the job site.  The truth may disappoint temporarily, but it cannot discourage permanently.  If Donald Trump is an honorable American, that truth will unfold to the benefit of all.  The discovery of who he is will be attained through honesty with ourselves.

Here is a good way to talk to children about the problems of open borders and the ideas of Trump.  Take the child to the front door of your house or apartment.  Show him the  lock and say, "We have to keep this door locked because only people we have invited can come into our house.  If all the people outside could come in here whenever they wanted, it wouldn't be a good place to live anymore.  People who love America are going to build a strong wall like this wall and a big door like this one.  Then friends can come over, and we can also have America for a long, long time."