Too Many Black People in Prison -- And Other Fairy Tales

The great and powerful Leo Strine figured it all out: Too many black people are spending too much time in prison.

Strine should know: He is Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court.  Strine is heading a commission of black history professors, public defenders, diversity officers, ACLU staffers and others to set this right.

Their mission: Figure out why cops keep arresting, prosecutors keep prosecuting, juries keep convicting, and judges keep sending so many black people to prison for No Reason What So Ever.

And why black people keep returning to prison once they are let out.

Not just in Delaware but around the country.

The biggest newspaper in Delaware went all in to help solve this mystery.

“Strine said the goal is to find common sense solutions to address the racial disproportions that clearly exist in the system. About 22 percent of the state's residents are black, but nearly 6 in 10 inmates in Delaware's prisons are black, according to 2014 statistics from the Department of Correction.

"The most urgent justice issue we have is the continuing inequality in society," Strine said.

In Strine’s world, either lots and lots of black people are in jail for no reason. Or lots and lots of white people belong in jail, but get away with murder — and burglary and assault and shootings and stealing cars and lots of other crimes.

The solution to the both scenarios is easy enough:  Rustle up the victims, videos, witnesses, police reports, 911 calls and other evidence so Strine can free the wrongly imprisoned and imprison the unjustly free.

If racist cops, judges and juries are not doing their jobs, at least produce a few dozen victims. They should be easy to find.

But they are not. Because they do not exist.

Instead, Strine et al produce fairy tales about how white people and black people commit the same amount of crime, but racist white cops only pick on black people.  It’s not just Strine, black police chiefs,  black sheriffs, black bureaucrats from the Department of Education and even the Attorney General concoct the same stories.

Then they trot out bogus academic studies to support it.

In Strine’s world, black people are relentless victims of relentless white racism. All the time. Everywhere. And that explains everything.

That is the greatest lie of our generation.

In the real world, black crime rates are wildly out of proportion. And the real numbers are even worse than that. Think stitches for snitches. Witness intimidation. Bronx juries. And failure to report crimes like rape.

There are lots of examples of Strine’s home turf:

In Wilmington, Delaware recently, police shot and killed a black man in a wheelchair after a black neighbor dialed 911 to report he had a gun and was acting crazy.

The dead man’s mom insisted he had no gun. Then she and some thugs went to where she thought the witness lived and beat the hell out of the person who answered the door.

They assaulted the wrong person, but they delivered the right message: Do not talk to the cops about black crime.

A few days later in the same neighborhood, 400 black people harassed, threatened, taunted, assaulted and threw rocks and bottles at police and paramedics responding to a neighborhood shooting that had nothing to do with police.

Paramedics in Strine’s hometown wear bulletproof vests.

A new charter school for black students in Strine Town is on the verge of closing because students are creating so much mayhem and violence in class.

In 2013, a group of black people robbed a black mom and her child, again in Wilmington. She went to the cops. Friends of the criminals went back to the woman and reminded her how dangerous it would be for her to testify.

When she told them she was not afraid of them, they killed her. The killer is in jail. His crew is not.

There are lots more cases of witness intimidation in Delaware. If Judge Strine needs details, he only has to ask the lawyers on his panel who defend them.

Witness intimidation is now at epidemic levels around the country. In Philadelphia over a recent two-year period, the district attorney charged 2600 people with that crime.

Let’s not forget the Bronx jury: Black juries tend not to convict black defendants. In Brooklyn recently, defense attorneys were complaining that too many white people were moving into their borough, polluting the jury pool. Convicting too many black people.

Melissa Harris Perry of MSNBC recently was talking about how black women do not report rape because they fear what will happen to the black rapist once they are in the clutches of the racist police.

“We have an under-reporting of rape and domestic violence in African American communities,” Harris-Perry said. “Because we know the violence enacted on black men by police, so we often don’t call.”

In Memphis, 12,000 rape kits wait to be tested. Same with Detroit and New Orleans and many other Chocolate cities. These kits sit in warehouses for years.

What do you suppose that does for the violent crime statistics and your racial disparity, Justice Strine?       

These are just four ways that the black crime rate is artificially low. There are more. Lots of links, lots of stories, lots of videos with more examples in the Amazon #1 best seller, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry.

But many of the activists in Strine’s star chamber ignore, deny, condone, excuse, encourage and even lie about the level of black crime and the damage it does.

Then they blame it all on racist police — and pretend not to notice how this black mayhem has ruined the largest city in the state — a place that was once a charming working class enclave, but today makes Newsweek with a new name: Murder Town USA.

Here is a piece of truth for Strine and his band of apologists to choke on: Crime and violence in Wilmington is a black thing. That’s why more black people are in prison.

Strine knows that. So do his acolytes. The only question is why he and his crew are working so hard to avoid it.

Colin Flaherty is the author of that scintillating Amazon #1 Best Seller Dont Make the Black Kids Angry. Subscribe to his YouTube Channel here.

The great and powerful Leo Strine figured it all out: Too many black people are spending too much time in prison.

Strine should know: He is Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court.  Strine is heading a commission of black history professors, public defenders, diversity officers, ACLU staffers and others to set this right.

Their mission: Figure out why cops keep arresting, prosecutors keep prosecuting, juries keep convicting, and judges keep sending so many black people to prison for No Reason What So Ever.

And why black people keep returning to prison once they are let out.

Not just in Delaware but around the country.

The biggest newspaper in Delaware went all in to help solve this mystery.

“Strine said the goal is to find common sense solutions to address the racial disproportions that clearly exist in the system. About 22 percent of the state's residents are black, but nearly 6 in 10 inmates in Delaware's prisons are black, according to 2014 statistics from the Department of Correction.

"The most urgent justice issue we have is the continuing inequality in society," Strine said.

In Strine’s world, either lots and lots of black people are in jail for no reason. Or lots and lots of white people belong in jail, but get away with murder — and burglary and assault and shootings and stealing cars and lots of other crimes.

The solution to the both scenarios is easy enough:  Rustle up the victims, videos, witnesses, police reports, 911 calls and other evidence so Strine can free the wrongly imprisoned and imprison the unjustly free.

If racist cops, judges and juries are not doing their jobs, at least produce a few dozen victims. They should be easy to find.

But they are not. Because they do not exist.

Instead, Strine et al produce fairy tales about how white people and black people commit the same amount of crime, but racist white cops only pick on black people.  It’s not just Strine, black police chiefs,  black sheriffs, black bureaucrats from the Department of Education and even the Attorney General concoct the same stories.

Then they trot out bogus academic studies to support it.

In Strine’s world, black people are relentless victims of relentless white racism. All the time. Everywhere. And that explains everything.

That is the greatest lie of our generation.

In the real world, black crime rates are wildly out of proportion. And the real numbers are even worse than that. Think stitches for snitches. Witness intimidation. Bronx juries. And failure to report crimes like rape.

There are lots of examples of Strine’s home turf:

In Wilmington, Delaware recently, police shot and killed a black man in a wheelchair after a black neighbor dialed 911 to report he had a gun and was acting crazy.

The dead man’s mom insisted he had no gun. Then she and some thugs went to where she thought the witness lived and beat the hell out of the person who answered the door.

They assaulted the wrong person, but they delivered the right message: Do not talk to the cops about black crime.

A few days later in the same neighborhood, 400 black people harassed, threatened, taunted, assaulted and threw rocks and bottles at police and paramedics responding to a neighborhood shooting that had nothing to do with police.

Paramedics in Strine’s hometown wear bulletproof vests.

A new charter school for black students in Strine Town is on the verge of closing because students are creating so much mayhem and violence in class.

In 2013, a group of black people robbed a black mom and her child, again in Wilmington. She went to the cops. Friends of the criminals went back to the woman and reminded her how dangerous it would be for her to testify.

When she told them she was not afraid of them, they killed her. The killer is in jail. His crew is not.

There are lots more cases of witness intimidation in Delaware. If Judge Strine needs details, he only has to ask the lawyers on his panel who defend them.

Witness intimidation is now at epidemic levels around the country. In Philadelphia over a recent two-year period, the district attorney charged 2600 people with that crime.

Let’s not forget the Bronx jury: Black juries tend not to convict black defendants. In Brooklyn recently, defense attorneys were complaining that too many white people were moving into their borough, polluting the jury pool. Convicting too many black people.

Melissa Harris Perry of MSNBC recently was talking about how black women do not report rape because they fear what will happen to the black rapist once they are in the clutches of the racist police.

“We have an under-reporting of rape and domestic violence in African American communities,” Harris-Perry said. “Because we know the violence enacted on black men by police, so we often don’t call.”

In Memphis, 12,000 rape kits wait to be tested. Same with Detroit and New Orleans and many other Chocolate cities. These kits sit in warehouses for years.

What do you suppose that does for the violent crime statistics and your racial disparity, Justice Strine?       

These are just four ways that the black crime rate is artificially low. There are more. Lots of links, lots of stories, lots of videos with more examples in the Amazon #1 best seller, Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry.

But many of the activists in Strine’s star chamber ignore, deny, condone, excuse, encourage and even lie about the level of black crime and the damage it does.

Then they blame it all on racist police — and pretend not to notice how this black mayhem has ruined the largest city in the state — a place that was once a charming working class enclave, but today makes Newsweek with a new name: Murder Town USA.

Here is a piece of truth for Strine and his band of apologists to choke on: Crime and violence in Wilmington is a black thing. That’s why more black people are in prison.

Strine knows that. So do his acolytes. The only question is why he and his crew are working so hard to avoid it.

Colin Flaherty is the author of that scintillating Amazon #1 Best Seller Dont Make the Black Kids Angry. Subscribe to his YouTube Channel here.