Hillary on Police Brutality

As part of her desperate attempt to reinsert herself into the White House, Hillary Clinton, who now has coded sexism on her radar, has added police brutality and racial injustice to her list of concerns.

And trust me, Hillary Clinton knows a thing or two about race.  After all, she's married to America's first black president, Bill Clinton, and can quote the lyrics of black Gospel songs with an inflection so authentic that if the late Queen of Gospel, Mahalia Jackson, were to hear it, she would surely shout, "Glory, hallelujah."

Hillary is a woman who "don't feel no ways tired … [and she] … don't believe He brought [her] this far to leave [her]" stranded in Chappaqua baking cookies for a guy who spends time partying with perverts on "Orgy Island."

That's why the presidential hopeful has come up with a timely plan on how to monitor unruly law enforcement and safeguard misunderstood black rioters.

Recently, in a keynote speech given at the David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in New York City, Clinton, a woman who "unmistakably and undeniably" refuses to address issues such as Benghazi, uranium to Russia, or 30,000 missing e-mails, preached to the choir that now is the time to address the "unmistakable and undeniable" racial patterns exhibited by America's police.

Hillary, who shouted, "What difference at this point does it make?" when referring to four dead Americans in Benghazi, shared that "[a]s a citizen, a human being, my heart breaks" for the young black men killed at the hands of law enforcement.

At Columbia University, the woman who has refused to come to terms with some hard truths about her husband, herself, and the vast history of dishonesty that infuses their political careers discussed blacks and alleged police brutality by saying, "We have to come to terms with some hard truths about race and justice in America."

Then, elevating imperiousness and total lack of self-awareness to a whole new level, the shamelessly out-of-balance Hillary stressed: "We have allowed our criminal justice system to get out of balance and these recent tragedies should galvanize us to come together as a nation to find our balance again."

Before sharing these views, Hillary, who generally refuses to answer questions, demanded answers on Twitter concerning the death of Freddie Gray, the black man at the center of the Baltimore riots.

But when appearing live, Mrs. Clinton floated policy proposals that she said she feels need to be implemented "on our streets, in our courthouses, in our jails and prisons, in communities too long neglected."

Predictably, in that speech, Hillary, who, together with Bill, has amassed a fortune allegedly totaling upwards of $50 million, broached the subject of income inequality by linking that topic to the streets of Ferguson and Baltimore.

According to the woman with a carpetbag stuffed to the gills with dirty money, and who, if asked a question, is honest about absolutely nothing, "[w]e also have to be honest about gaps that exist across our country, the inequality that stalks our streets."

When Mrs. Clinton practiced law in Arkansas, her lawyering skills kept a child rapist out of jail.  Forty years later, Hillary is arguing that now is the "time to change our approach. It is time to end the era of mass incarceration."  According to Ms. Hillary, "[w]e need a true national debate about how to reduce our prison population while keeping our communities safe."

Maybe before the presumptive Democrat presidential nominee opens the prison doors and sets the captives free, she should spend a few hours speaking with the elderly nun who was recently raped in a home invasion by 27-year-old Juan Rudolph, an hour from Baltimore in Prince George's County, Maryland.

Back when Bill was president, Hillary promoted her husband's 1994 crime bill, which, in the present political climate and according to her latest comments, she apparently now feels is either counterproductive to reducing crime or, more likely, a hindrance to her getting elected.

Nevertheless, in her keynote speech, Hillary, the wise old sage of matrimonial bliss, shared advice with her audience she should have been following in her own marriage for the last forty years but hasn't: "missing husbands, missing fathers, missing brothers" bring "profound consequences" to families.

And while up to that point everything Hillary Clinton said at the forum reeked of profound hypocrisy, the absolute pièce de résistance came when the former first lady called for body cameras to be the "norm everywhere," saying:

We should make sure that every police department in the country has body cameras to record interaction between officers on patrol and suspects.  That will improve transparency and accountability … [and] will help protect good people on both sides of the lens.

Then again, putting aside the obvious double standard of Hillary's proposal, under the right conditions, the body cam does have the potential to be a valuable tool.  And to prove it, on behalf of keeping the nation's police in line and extending racial justice to black youth, Hillary Clinton should test-drive the idea herself. 

For starters, Mrs. Clinton can illustrate how well body cameras work for moderating bad behavior by pinning one on her horndog husband to "record [his] interactions" with, oh, let's say, underage girls.

As for Hillary, sadly, she missed the opportunity to record the fateful night the U.S. Special Forces in Libya were told to "stand down," or the day she and Bill sold uranium to the Russians for big bucks, or the afternoon two years after leaving office when, before wiping clean her personal e-mail server, she corresponded with 30,000 yoga enthusiasts.

But it's never too late!  If Hillary Clinton really wants to "improve transparency and accountability," henceforth and for the remainder of her presidential campaign she'll have the perfect opportunity to set the example by attaching that tell-all body camera she's so excited about to the lapel of her own pantsuit

Jeannie hosts a blog at www.jeannie-ology.com.

As part of her desperate attempt to reinsert herself into the White House, Hillary Clinton, who now has coded sexism on her radar, has added police brutality and racial injustice to her list of concerns.

And trust me, Hillary Clinton knows a thing or two about race.  After all, she's married to America's first black president, Bill Clinton, and can quote the lyrics of black Gospel songs with an inflection so authentic that if the late Queen of Gospel, Mahalia Jackson, were to hear it, she would surely shout, "Glory, hallelujah."

Hillary is a woman who "don't feel no ways tired … [and she] … don't believe He brought [her] this far to leave [her]" stranded in Chappaqua baking cookies for a guy who spends time partying with perverts on "Orgy Island."

That's why the presidential hopeful has come up with a timely plan on how to monitor unruly law enforcement and safeguard misunderstood black rioters.

Recently, in a keynote speech given at the David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in New York City, Clinton, a woman who "unmistakably and undeniably" refuses to address issues such as Benghazi, uranium to Russia, or 30,000 missing e-mails, preached to the choir that now is the time to address the "unmistakable and undeniable" racial patterns exhibited by America's police.

Hillary, who shouted, "What difference at this point does it make?" when referring to four dead Americans in Benghazi, shared that "[a]s a citizen, a human being, my heart breaks" for the young black men killed at the hands of law enforcement.

At Columbia University, the woman who has refused to come to terms with some hard truths about her husband, herself, and the vast history of dishonesty that infuses their political careers discussed blacks and alleged police brutality by saying, "We have to come to terms with some hard truths about race and justice in America."

Then, elevating imperiousness and total lack of self-awareness to a whole new level, the shamelessly out-of-balance Hillary stressed: "We have allowed our criminal justice system to get out of balance and these recent tragedies should galvanize us to come together as a nation to find our balance again."

Before sharing these views, Hillary, who generally refuses to answer questions, demanded answers on Twitter concerning the death of Freddie Gray, the black man at the center of the Baltimore riots.

But when appearing live, Mrs. Clinton floated policy proposals that she said she feels need to be implemented "on our streets, in our courthouses, in our jails and prisons, in communities too long neglected."

Predictably, in that speech, Hillary, who, together with Bill, has amassed a fortune allegedly totaling upwards of $50 million, broached the subject of income inequality by linking that topic to the streets of Ferguson and Baltimore.

According to the woman with a carpetbag stuffed to the gills with dirty money, and who, if asked a question, is honest about absolutely nothing, "[w]e also have to be honest about gaps that exist across our country, the inequality that stalks our streets."

When Mrs. Clinton practiced law in Arkansas, her lawyering skills kept a child rapist out of jail.  Forty years later, Hillary is arguing that now is the "time to change our approach. It is time to end the era of mass incarceration."  According to Ms. Hillary, "[w]e need a true national debate about how to reduce our prison population while keeping our communities safe."

Maybe before the presumptive Democrat presidential nominee opens the prison doors and sets the captives free, she should spend a few hours speaking with the elderly nun who was recently raped in a home invasion by 27-year-old Juan Rudolph, an hour from Baltimore in Prince George's County, Maryland.

Back when Bill was president, Hillary promoted her husband's 1994 crime bill, which, in the present political climate and according to her latest comments, she apparently now feels is either counterproductive to reducing crime or, more likely, a hindrance to her getting elected.

Nevertheless, in her keynote speech, Hillary, the wise old sage of matrimonial bliss, shared advice with her audience she should have been following in her own marriage for the last forty years but hasn't: "missing husbands, missing fathers, missing brothers" bring "profound consequences" to families.

And while up to that point everything Hillary Clinton said at the forum reeked of profound hypocrisy, the absolute pièce de résistance came when the former first lady called for body cameras to be the "norm everywhere," saying:

We should make sure that every police department in the country has body cameras to record interaction between officers on patrol and suspects.  That will improve transparency and accountability … [and] will help protect good people on both sides of the lens.

Then again, putting aside the obvious double standard of Hillary's proposal, under the right conditions, the body cam does have the potential to be a valuable tool.  And to prove it, on behalf of keeping the nation's police in line and extending racial justice to black youth, Hillary Clinton should test-drive the idea herself. 

For starters, Mrs. Clinton can illustrate how well body cameras work for moderating bad behavior by pinning one on her horndog husband to "record [his] interactions" with, oh, let's say, underage girls.

As for Hillary, sadly, she missed the opportunity to record the fateful night the U.S. Special Forces in Libya were told to "stand down," or the day she and Bill sold uranium to the Russians for big bucks, or the afternoon two years after leaving office when, before wiping clean her personal e-mail server, she corresponded with 30,000 yoga enthusiasts.

But it's never too late!  If Hillary Clinton really wants to "improve transparency and accountability," henceforth and for the remainder of her presidential campaign she'll have the perfect opportunity to set the example by attaching that tell-all body camera she's so excited about to the lapel of her own pantsuit

Jeannie hosts a blog at www.jeannie-ology.com.