Supporting the Police

How quickly Americans forget who are the true heroes. There is so much police-hating rhetoric that it is nauseating.  People can debate about Michael Brown and Eric Garner, but there is one issue that is not debatable: almost all of the men and women of police departments are “living, breathing human beings” who are symbols of hope, justice, safety, and the warrior spirit. American Thinker had the privilege of interviewing a few of NYPD’s finest, and that is a literal statement.

On September 12th, 2001 the first responders, both police and firemen, were heralded as heroes with numerous outpourings of praise. Then Cardinal Edward M. Egan, who was archbishop on the day of the attacks, gave a heartwarming benediction, “On 9/11, and on the days that followed, I became a member of the congregation... No one preached more powerfully than New York’s Finest. The Police Department of the City of New York, from the chief down to the rank-in-file, their sermon was about total sacrifice for others.” So what happened between then and now?

All interviewed believe that Americans have short memories. People forget that twenty-three NYPD officers died on 9/11 and approximately fifty died from injury and illnesses incurred during the rescue and aftermath. Gil Alba had a distinguished career with the New York City Police Department, attaining the highest investigative rank, First Grade Detective. He wants to remind people that, “During 9/11 cops ran up the World Trade Center Towers with the firemen. Everyone was wearing the hats of the NYPD.  Every day the police go to work knowing they might die for the people of New York. We run to the fight, not away from it.” 

Former New York Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik wants Americans to understand the police are very vulnerable as evidenced by the assassination of the two NYPD cops, Officer Rafael Ramos and Officer Wenjian Liu. He agrees with Ramos’ son, who posted on Facebook, “It's horrible that someone gets shot dead just for being a police officer. Everyone says they hate cops but they are the people that they call for help.” Kerik challenges Americans to think about how many times they have heard anything positive said about cops. “What no one realizes is that when you hear about some major violent assault it was the cops that put their life on the line. Yet, they rarely get the recognition and credit.”

Those interviewed are disgusted at the lack of support and the incendiary remarks made about the police that contributed to the targeted killings of the two NYPD officers. The police have been called pigs, spat upon, and told they should not wear their uniforms in public.  Sound familiar? It is reminiscent of the suffering by the Vietnam War military veterans. But it goes beyond that with the protestor chant of, “What do we want. -- dead cops.  When do we want it -- now.” During his mayoral campaign de Blasio crusaded against what he viewed as overreaching by the police in the Bloomberg administration. He said this about his son, “Because of a history that still hangs over us, the dangers he may face, we've had to literally train him, as families have all over this city for decades, in how to take special care in any encounter he has with the police officers who are there to protect him… So I've had to worry over the years. Chirlane's had to worry. Is Dante safe each night? There are so many families in this city who feel that each and every night. Is my child safe? And not just from some of the painful realities, crime and violence in some of our neighborhoods, but is safe from the very people they want to have faith in as their protectors.”

Since the NYPD are considered the “melting pot of law enforcement,” it is laughable that they are accused as an institution of being racist. The men and women that make up the police force are a diverse cross section of the population. Approximately fifty percent of those serving are minorities. 

There is plenty of direct and indirect blame to go around for the threats, shootings, and killings of the police. Patrick J. Brosnan, a NYPD highly-decorated former detective, believes “We are no longer considered New York’s finest, but racist thugs. This irresponsible rhetoric has consequences. This should not be allowed, just as yelling fire in a crowded movie theater is against the law. The mayor should never have projected and conveyed his narrative since it was inflammatory, and has tragic, sad, and deadly consequences. These deranged individuals that attempt to attack the police, as well as the person who assassinated two of our finest, are susceptible and will soak up the rhetoric of hate like a sponge. I don’t think the mayor ever thought his actions and statements would have such a horrifying result. He must recognize the police are not monsters.”

Kerik feels there is plenty of blame to go around regarding the threats, attacks, and the assassination of the two police officers. He blames a society where violent behavior is rewarded and encouraged while respect for the law is discouraged. “My son is half-Latino and he was taught to be law abiding. Compare that to what the mayor said. Just look at this latest shooting incident in Missouri. It shows how insane we have become as a society. There is a video showing a young man aiming a gun at a cop and was shot as a result. Yet, the media says that a cop shot a black man. By questioning that response you make that criminal a victim. Something is wrong unless we want a completely lawless society.”

Furthermore, he wonders why President Obama did not hold a press conference for the two dead police as he had for Brown and Garner. To him, this means, “the president of the U.S. does not recognize the importance of those who protect our society.”

All this hatred toward the police can only result in a morale problem, which the current New York Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed. Brosnan hopes the mayor understands, “He brought this department to its knees.  It has become weakened after the ‘Commander-In-Chief’ sided with those who are anti-police. These protests are all about the police. If you are not anti-police why are you protesting?”

Kerik agrees, and points out that those in the NYPD will not take an aggressive stance towards crime prevention because they are scared it will be construed in the wrong way. “These cops have worked in minority communities for years and have reduced violent crime and homicides by approximately 80%. When the New York City cops were saving lives no one was saying the police tactics were terrible. They wanted more aggressive cops to reduce crimes. They were not racially profiling but were criminally profiling.”

By far the majority of police officers across the nation are true heroes.  Every day they put their lives on the line for people regardless of their race, religion, or sex. It appears they are underappreciated and underpaid for what they do. All Americans need to speak out in support of the police. Hopefully next time someone sees a police officer they will shake his hand and thank him for putting their life on the line each and every day.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

How quickly Americans forget who are the true heroes. There is so much police-hating rhetoric that it is nauseating.  People can debate about Michael Brown and Eric Garner, but there is one issue that is not debatable: almost all of the men and women of police departments are “living, breathing human beings” who are symbols of hope, justice, safety, and the warrior spirit. American Thinker had the privilege of interviewing a few of NYPD’s finest, and that is a literal statement.

On September 12th, 2001 the first responders, both police and firemen, were heralded as heroes with numerous outpourings of praise. Then Cardinal Edward M. Egan, who was archbishop on the day of the attacks, gave a heartwarming benediction, “On 9/11, and on the days that followed, I became a member of the congregation... No one preached more powerfully than New York’s Finest. The Police Department of the City of New York, from the chief down to the rank-in-file, their sermon was about total sacrifice for others.” So what happened between then and now?

All interviewed believe that Americans have short memories. People forget that twenty-three NYPD officers died on 9/11 and approximately fifty died from injury and illnesses incurred during the rescue and aftermath. Gil Alba had a distinguished career with the New York City Police Department, attaining the highest investigative rank, First Grade Detective. He wants to remind people that, “During 9/11 cops ran up the World Trade Center Towers with the firemen. Everyone was wearing the hats of the NYPD.  Every day the police go to work knowing they might die for the people of New York. We run to the fight, not away from it.” 

Former New York Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik wants Americans to understand the police are very vulnerable as evidenced by the assassination of the two NYPD cops, Officer Rafael Ramos and Officer Wenjian Liu. He agrees with Ramos’ son, who posted on Facebook, “It's horrible that someone gets shot dead just for being a police officer. Everyone says they hate cops but they are the people that they call for help.” Kerik challenges Americans to think about how many times they have heard anything positive said about cops. “What no one realizes is that when you hear about some major violent assault it was the cops that put their life on the line. Yet, they rarely get the recognition and credit.”

Those interviewed are disgusted at the lack of support and the incendiary remarks made about the police that contributed to the targeted killings of the two NYPD officers. The police have been called pigs, spat upon, and told they should not wear their uniforms in public.  Sound familiar? It is reminiscent of the suffering by the Vietnam War military veterans. But it goes beyond that with the protestor chant of, “What do we want. -- dead cops.  When do we want it -- now.” During his mayoral campaign de Blasio crusaded against what he viewed as overreaching by the police in the Bloomberg administration. He said this about his son, “Because of a history that still hangs over us, the dangers he may face, we've had to literally train him, as families have all over this city for decades, in how to take special care in any encounter he has with the police officers who are there to protect him… So I've had to worry over the years. Chirlane's had to worry. Is Dante safe each night? There are so many families in this city who feel that each and every night. Is my child safe? And not just from some of the painful realities, crime and violence in some of our neighborhoods, but is safe from the very people they want to have faith in as their protectors.”

Since the NYPD are considered the “melting pot of law enforcement,” it is laughable that they are accused as an institution of being racist. The men and women that make up the police force are a diverse cross section of the population. Approximately fifty percent of those serving are minorities. 

There is plenty of direct and indirect blame to go around for the threats, shootings, and killings of the police. Patrick J. Brosnan, a NYPD highly-decorated former detective, believes “We are no longer considered New York’s finest, but racist thugs. This irresponsible rhetoric has consequences. This should not be allowed, just as yelling fire in a crowded movie theater is against the law. The mayor should never have projected and conveyed his narrative since it was inflammatory, and has tragic, sad, and deadly consequences. These deranged individuals that attempt to attack the police, as well as the person who assassinated two of our finest, are susceptible and will soak up the rhetoric of hate like a sponge. I don’t think the mayor ever thought his actions and statements would have such a horrifying result. He must recognize the police are not monsters.”

Kerik feels there is plenty of blame to go around regarding the threats, attacks, and the assassination of the two police officers. He blames a society where violent behavior is rewarded and encouraged while respect for the law is discouraged. “My son is half-Latino and he was taught to be law abiding. Compare that to what the mayor said. Just look at this latest shooting incident in Missouri. It shows how insane we have become as a society. There is a video showing a young man aiming a gun at a cop and was shot as a result. Yet, the media says that a cop shot a black man. By questioning that response you make that criminal a victim. Something is wrong unless we want a completely lawless society.”

Furthermore, he wonders why President Obama did not hold a press conference for the two dead police as he had for Brown and Garner. To him, this means, “the president of the U.S. does not recognize the importance of those who protect our society.”

All this hatred toward the police can only result in a morale problem, which the current New York Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed. Brosnan hopes the mayor understands, “He brought this department to its knees.  It has become weakened after the ‘Commander-In-Chief’ sided with those who are anti-police. These protests are all about the police. If you are not anti-police why are you protesting?”

Kerik agrees, and points out that those in the NYPD will not take an aggressive stance towards crime prevention because they are scared it will be construed in the wrong way. “These cops have worked in minority communities for years and have reduced violent crime and homicides by approximately 80%. When the New York City cops were saving lives no one was saying the police tactics were terrible. They wanted more aggressive cops to reduce crimes. They were not racially profiling but were criminally profiling.”

By far the majority of police officers across the nation are true heroes.  Every day they put their lives on the line for people regardless of their race, religion, or sex. It appears they are underappreciated and underpaid for what they do. All Americans need to speak out in support of the police. Hopefully next time someone sees a police officer they will shake his hand and thank him for putting their life on the line each and every day.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.