Lying Eyes of the Democrats

By now the Democrats' deceitful campaign tactics should not surprise Republicans. They are using the throwbacks to the 2012 campaign in the election coming up in November. Whether it is referring to the “War On Women,” or “Income Inequality,” the Democratic candidates have no shame.

Running for the Senate seat in New Mexico, businessman and retired Marine Colonel Allen Weh is facing an uphill battle against Democratic incumbent Tom Udall. Weh told American Thinker that he has had to combat attacks from Udall who claims that Weh wants to cut Medicare and Social Security. “I was expecting the commercial where he shows me throwing grandma over the cliff. I never said that about the cuts. The basis for the attack was my desire to have a balanced budget amendment. Supposedly the one produced in Congress accounted for some cuts in the entitlement programs. But that was not my bill, and I never was in Congress to vote for it.”

Udall is also trying to put him on the defensive regarding his successful business career as the Chief Executive Officer of CSI Aviation Inc. He accused Web of that terrible word, being a multimillionaire. Web is hoping the electorate will start to become tired of these same old sound bites that they play over and over again. “I started a business and built it up. I am proud of what I have done and will not apologize. I will not play this game of politics involving envy, greed, and deceit. Here is the irony: two years ago Udall’s worth was at 2.5 million dollars. I was told it has increased substantially. He is a multimillionaire attacking me on that issue. Yet, he made his fortune while in elected office, while I made mine with a startup business.”

Republican Congressman Cory Gardner also must combat the Democrats’ lies as he tries to unseat Mark Udall in the Colorado election. Udall is attempting to portray Gardner as “anti-women” by appealing to women’s womb issues such as birth control and abortion. Obviously buoyed by this liberal obsession and the previous political success Udall attempted it again in 2014. Yet, this time something is different. Many women voters are seeing through this demeaning characterization and instead care about issues such as the economy, health-care, and the safety of Americans. In Colorado, where one of the most closely watched Senate races is happening, a Magellan Strategies poll of female swing voters found 77% of respondents said they saw through the "war on women" messaging strategy. Even the left-of-center Denver Post has endorsed Gardner, explaining “Rather than run on his record, Udall’s campaign has devoted a shocking amount of energy and money trying to convince voters that Gardner seeks to outlaw birth control despite the congressman’s call for over-the-counter sales of contraceptives. Udall is trying to frig

hten voters rather than inspire them with a hopeful vision. His obnoxious one-issue campaign is an insult to those he seeks to convince.”

Republican candidate Martha McSally who is running for Gabby Gifford’s Congressional seat, told American Thinker that she also has a “war of women” waged against her. She noted, “This is a tool by the Democratic Party to scare women voters against any Republican candidate. Women in my district care about economic opportunity, educational advancement, health care, and their own safety. It is disingenuous for the Democrats to use these terms to win over female voters if you look around the world and see what is happening to women: being used for sex trafficking, and in the Islamist world having to combat lack of rights and extreme violence.”

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers holds the powerful number-four position of the Republican leadership team, and regularly points out why Republicans are the party of women. She believes that women should be spoken to as intellectuals and are no longer voting on a single issue. Her desire is to empower them at work and at home. Her solutions include increasing flexible schedules in the workplace, improving job training, and increasing take-home pay.

The congresswoman also points out that on the Republican leadership team there are three women out of eight. Four out of five women governors are Republicans and six out of ten lieutnenant governors. “Republicans won the women’s vote in 2010 because 87% care about and make the health care decisions. In 2012 I think we lost because of the outrageous damaging comments made by Mourdoch and Akin. I think it will be different this go-around.”

Many voters are realizing that the slogans of the Democrats are just that, without any true meaning. Republicans are still being put on the defensive but they are making strong arguments to combat these untruths. Hopefully in 2014 the electorate will realize that the Republicans are the party to make America great again.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.

By now the Democrats' deceitful campaign tactics should not surprise Republicans. They are using the throwbacks to the 2012 campaign in the election coming up in November. Whether it is referring to the “War On Women,” or “Income Inequality,” the Democratic candidates have no shame.

Running for the Senate seat in New Mexico, businessman and retired Marine Colonel Allen Weh is facing an uphill battle against Democratic incumbent Tom Udall. Weh told American Thinker that he has had to combat attacks from Udall who claims that Weh wants to cut Medicare and Social Security. “I was expecting the commercial where he shows me throwing grandma over the cliff. I never said that about the cuts. The basis for the attack was my desire to have a balanced budget amendment. Supposedly the one produced in Congress accounted for some cuts in the entitlement programs. But that was not my bill, and I never was in Congress to vote for it.”

Udall is also trying to put him on the defensive regarding his successful business career as the Chief Executive Officer of CSI Aviation Inc. He accused Web of that terrible word, being a multimillionaire. Web is hoping the electorate will start to become tired of these same old sound bites that they play over and over again. “I started a business and built it up. I am proud of what I have done and will not apologize. I will not play this game of politics involving envy, greed, and deceit. Here is the irony: two years ago Udall’s worth was at 2.5 million dollars. I was told it has increased substantially. He is a multimillionaire attacking me on that issue. Yet, he made his fortune while in elected office, while I made mine with a startup business.”

Republican Congressman Cory Gardner also must combat the Democrats’ lies as he tries to unseat Mark Udall in the Colorado election. Udall is attempting to portray Gardner as “anti-women” by appealing to women’s womb issues such as birth control and abortion. Obviously buoyed by this liberal obsession and the previous political success Udall attempted it again in 2014. Yet, this time something is different. Many women voters are seeing through this demeaning characterization and instead care about issues such as the economy, health-care, and the safety of Americans. In Colorado, where one of the most closely watched Senate races is happening, a Magellan Strategies poll of female swing voters found 77% of respondents said they saw through the "war on women" messaging strategy. Even the left-of-center Denver Post has endorsed Gardner, explaining “Rather than run on his record, Udall’s campaign has devoted a shocking amount of energy and money trying to convince voters that Gardner seeks to outlaw birth control despite the congressman’s call for over-the-counter sales of contraceptives. Udall is trying to frig

hten voters rather than inspire them with a hopeful vision. His obnoxious one-issue campaign is an insult to those he seeks to convince.”

Republican candidate Martha McSally who is running for Gabby Gifford’s Congressional seat, told American Thinker that she also has a “war of women” waged against her. She noted, “This is a tool by the Democratic Party to scare women voters against any Republican candidate. Women in my district care about economic opportunity, educational advancement, health care, and their own safety. It is disingenuous for the Democrats to use these terms to win over female voters if you look around the world and see what is happening to women: being used for sex trafficking, and in the Islamist world having to combat lack of rights and extreme violence.”

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers holds the powerful number-four position of the Republican leadership team, and regularly points out why Republicans are the party of women. She believes that women should be spoken to as intellectuals and are no longer voting on a single issue. Her desire is to empower them at work and at home. Her solutions include increasing flexible schedules in the workplace, improving job training, and increasing take-home pay.

The congresswoman also points out that on the Republican leadership team there are three women out of eight. Four out of five women governors are Republicans and six out of ten lieutnenant governors. “Republicans won the women’s vote in 2010 because 87% care about and make the health care decisions. In 2012 I think we lost because of the outrageous damaging comments made by Mourdoch and Akin. I think it will be different this go-around.”

Many voters are realizing that the slogans of the Democrats are just that, without any true meaning. Republicans are still being put on the defensive but they are making strong arguments to combat these untruths. Hopefully in 2014 the electorate will realize that the Republicans are the party to make America great again.

The author writes for American Thinker.  She has done book reviews, author interviews, and has written a number of national security, political, and foreign policy articles.