Globalism vs. Jingoism

With the current National Security Agency (NSA) scandal unfolding, two new political genres seem to have emerged to compete with the liberal-versus-conservative paradigm we know.  These are jingoism and globalism.

The former are American patriots sworn to defend and uphold the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic.  Theodore Roosevelt declared, "If  by jingoism they mean a policy in pursuance of which Americans will with resolution and common sense insist upon our rights being respected by foreign powers, then we are 'jingoes.'"  The latter are ideologues dedicated the  suspension of the Constitution and the dissolution of the American republic in favor of becoming an appendage of a global government controlled by the United Nations.  These globalists among us have heretofore enjoyed relative anonymity while working indefatigably in various positions of influence within government to subvert the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

A proverb succinctly articulates the political milieu in America today: "When you cast a stone into a pack of dogs, the dog that yelps is the one that got hit."  Edward Snowden cast that stone, and boy, did the globalists yelp!

To wit: former vice president Dick Cheney appeared on Fox News Sunday fiercely defending the legality and necessity of government surveillance authority as wielded by the NSA.  Cheney claimed  that if these two programs, leaked by Snowden, whom Cheney accused of treason, had been in place, the 9/11 terrorist attack might have been thwarted.  If he is correct, how and why did the NSA surveillance lose track of hundreds of assault weapons sold by ATF agents to Mexican drug cartels?  Why was the NSA unable to deter Maj. Nidal Hasan from his "workplace violence" at Fort Hood, Texas?  And why was the FBI oblivious to the multiple harbingers of the nefarious activities of the  Tsarnaev brothers prior to their ignominious bombing at the Boston Marathon?  One wonders if the NSA recorded the 911 call from a private citizen informing authorities of the presence of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding in his boat after the clueless FBI had held the entire city of Boston under lockdown for three days.

Verizon customer Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) states he has no problem with his phone company turning over his call records to the NSA, asserting his complete confidence in the "government trying to match up calls between known terrorists."  Continuing, Graham said, "I'm glad the NSA is trying to find out what the terrorists are up to overseas and in our country."  Graham said that Snowden compromised national security and wants to see him arrested, but he is unclear on what charges Snowden should face.  Score two globalist hits by stone-throwing Snowden.

When George Stephanopoulos asked John Boehner his opinion of Snowden, the speaker replied, "He's a traitor. The disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk. It shows our adversaries what our capabilities are. And it's a giant violation of the law."

That's three prominent  establishment Republicans clearly expressing their  complete trust in the Obama regime to use the NSA's vast data-mining capabilities to pursue only terrorists and leave ordinary Americans alone.  Right -- just as the IRS fairly and equally approved 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for all applicants, regardless of political bent.  A bridge in Brooklyn, anyone? 

Now let's see what the "progressive"(read: socialist) Democrats are saying.  Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) states, "What Edward Snowden did amounts to an act of treason."

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) echoes Nelson: "I don't look at this as being a whistle-blower; I think it's an act of treason."  These are American lawmakers who are shamelessly ignoring the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution and defending this corrupt regime's right to violate the privacy of the American public.  That is a globalist position. 

Here is the stone Edward Snowden cast into the pack that caused these globalists to yelp: "I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate, which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in.  My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them."

Now let's look at the jingoist position.  Freshman Senator Rand Paul is sponsoring a class-action suit challenging the NSA's PRISM program, which logs Americans' phone calls and internet activities.  The litigation may include the entire American population as plaintives.  Paul said,  "I'm going to be asking all the internet providers and all of the phone companies: Ask your customers to join me in a class-action lawsuit.  If we get 10 million Americans saying we don't want our phone records looked at, then maybe someone will wake up, and something will change in Washington." 

Typically outspoken former congressman Ron Paul (Rand's father) had this to say: "I'm worried about [sic] somebody in our government might kill him [Snowden] with a cruise missile or a drone missile. I mean, we live in a bad time where American citizens don't even have rights and that they can be killed. But the gentleman is trying to tell the truth about what's going on." 

Senator Ted Cruz opined, "If it is the case that the federal government is seizing millions of personal records about law-abiding citizens, and if it is the case that there are minimal restrictions on accessing or reviewing those records, then I think Mr. Snowden has done a considerable public service by bringing it to light."

Finally, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) summed up the jingoist position.  "As one of the few members of Congress who consistently voted against the Patriot Act, I expressed concern at the time of passage that it gave the government far too much power to spy on innocent United State citizens and provided for very little oversight or disclosure. Unfortunately, what I said turned out to be exactly true. [Emphasis added.]

"The United States should not be accumulating phone records on tens of millions of innocent Americans. That is not what democracy is about. That is not what freedom is about. Congress must address this issue and protect the constitutional rights of the American people."

That's about as jingoistic as you can get.  Something is definitely rotten in America.

With the current National Security Agency (NSA) scandal unfolding, two new political genres seem to have emerged to compete with the liberal-versus-conservative paradigm we know.  These are jingoism and globalism.

The former are American patriots sworn to defend and uphold the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic.  Theodore Roosevelt declared, "If  by jingoism they mean a policy in pursuance of which Americans will with resolution and common sense insist upon our rights being respected by foreign powers, then we are 'jingoes.'"  The latter are ideologues dedicated the  suspension of the Constitution and the dissolution of the American republic in favor of becoming an appendage of a global government controlled by the United Nations.  These globalists among us have heretofore enjoyed relative anonymity while working indefatigably in various positions of influence within government to subvert the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

A proverb succinctly articulates the political milieu in America today: "When you cast a stone into a pack of dogs, the dog that yelps is the one that got hit."  Edward Snowden cast that stone, and boy, did the globalists yelp!

To wit: former vice president Dick Cheney appeared on Fox News Sunday fiercely defending the legality and necessity of government surveillance authority as wielded by the NSA.  Cheney claimed  that if these two programs, leaked by Snowden, whom Cheney accused of treason, had been in place, the 9/11 terrorist attack might have been thwarted.  If he is correct, how and why did the NSA surveillance lose track of hundreds of assault weapons sold by ATF agents to Mexican drug cartels?  Why was the NSA unable to deter Maj. Nidal Hasan from his "workplace violence" at Fort Hood, Texas?  And why was the FBI oblivious to the multiple harbingers of the nefarious activities of the  Tsarnaev brothers prior to their ignominious bombing at the Boston Marathon?  One wonders if the NSA recorded the 911 call from a private citizen informing authorities of the presence of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding in his boat after the clueless FBI had held the entire city of Boston under lockdown for three days.

Verizon customer Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) states he has no problem with his phone company turning over his call records to the NSA, asserting his complete confidence in the "government trying to match up calls between known terrorists."  Continuing, Graham said, "I'm glad the NSA is trying to find out what the terrorists are up to overseas and in our country."  Graham said that Snowden compromised national security and wants to see him arrested, but he is unclear on what charges Snowden should face.  Score two globalist hits by stone-throwing Snowden.

When George Stephanopoulos asked John Boehner his opinion of Snowden, the speaker replied, "He's a traitor. The disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk. It shows our adversaries what our capabilities are. And it's a giant violation of the law."

That's three prominent  establishment Republicans clearly expressing their  complete trust in the Obama regime to use the NSA's vast data-mining capabilities to pursue only terrorists and leave ordinary Americans alone.  Right -- just as the IRS fairly and equally approved 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status for all applicants, regardless of political bent.  A bridge in Brooklyn, anyone? 

Now let's see what the "progressive"(read: socialist) Democrats are saying.  Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) states, "What Edward Snowden did amounts to an act of treason."

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) echoes Nelson: "I don't look at this as being a whistle-blower; I think it's an act of treason."  These are American lawmakers who are shamelessly ignoring the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution and defending this corrupt regime's right to violate the privacy of the American public.  That is a globalist position. 

Here is the stone Edward Snowden cast into the pack that caused these globalists to yelp: "I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate, which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in.  My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them."

Now let's look at the jingoist position.  Freshman Senator Rand Paul is sponsoring a class-action suit challenging the NSA's PRISM program, which logs Americans' phone calls and internet activities.  The litigation may include the entire American population as plaintives.  Paul said,  "I'm going to be asking all the internet providers and all of the phone companies: Ask your customers to join me in a class-action lawsuit.  If we get 10 million Americans saying we don't want our phone records looked at, then maybe someone will wake up, and something will change in Washington." 

Typically outspoken former congressman Ron Paul (Rand's father) had this to say: "I'm worried about [sic] somebody in our government might kill him [Snowden] with a cruise missile or a drone missile. I mean, we live in a bad time where American citizens don't even have rights and that they can be killed. But the gentleman is trying to tell the truth about what's going on." 

Senator Ted Cruz opined, "If it is the case that the federal government is seizing millions of personal records about law-abiding citizens, and if it is the case that there are minimal restrictions on accessing or reviewing those records, then I think Mr. Snowden has done a considerable public service by bringing it to light."

Finally, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) summed up the jingoist position.  "As one of the few members of Congress who consistently voted against the Patriot Act, I expressed concern at the time of passage that it gave the government far too much power to spy on innocent United State citizens and provided for very little oversight or disclosure. Unfortunately, what I said turned out to be exactly true. [Emphasis added.]

"The United States should not be accumulating phone records on tens of millions of innocent Americans. That is not what democracy is about. That is not what freedom is about. Congress must address this issue and protect the constitutional rights of the American people."

That's about as jingoistic as you can get.  Something is definitely rotten in America.

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