AMERICA: Imagine the world without her

I highly recommend the new Dinesh D'Souza salvo at truth, optimism and the melioration of the endless lies proffered by the leftatariat who preach in the nation's wholly-owned radicalized college campii (my version of the plural form -- don't bother with Webster's or Wiktionary).

He goes into the 5 basic lies of America's birth promoted and promulgated by Saul Alinsky, author of  Reveille for Radicals (as well as its more famous successor, Rules for Radicals), the socialist sleaze who was a mentor to Hillary, as well as the guiding muck/light for the current occupant of the Oval Office.  Alinsky does not emerge as a nice person, nor a person a patriot could ever follow.



D'Souza frames the film in the Revolutionary War, and instead of Gen. Washington leading his men into victory against the Redcoats, Washington is shot by a sniper, falls to the ground, and his men surrender. America is not to be.

The Mumbai-born D'Souza, who came here when he was 17, carefully interviews the likes of acidulous America-hater, anti-Zionist cynic Noam Chomsky, captures some of the ugly in another Obama mentor, rapist and muni-bomber William Ayers, one of the ghost-writers of Obama's better "autobiography" (the less-well-written autobio was penned by someone lesser than Ayers, perhaps Obama himself; perhaps not).



It is hard to sit through the first 20 minutes of this merciful film, since it is all chunked up with these reprehensible haters of the US for the nonce. But D'Souza is fair, giving these sordid types leeway to put forth their insidious and untrue misappropriations of non-history.

Relief comes after these professorial historical histrionics are presented. The film carefully goes point for point, shredding the lies and distortions massaged by the adipose-friendly, hirsute Michael Moore and "historians" on major leftard campuses. 


The country's strangulating over-regulation is limned, as is the difficulty even the entrepreneurial spirit has triumphing over the endless asphyxiation of Obama's notion of redistributing the wealth from those who have worked for it to those he thinks should take it, one way or the other. D’Souza goes lightly into the administration's three scandals a week, and tells us about the spying that renders all our emails, telephone calls and everything else we send Open Sesame to the illegal actions of the government. He replays the beloved clips of Obama promising we can keep our doctors and keep our policies -- massive Pinocchios that won the President top liar award for last year.



Dinesh made three predictions before the 2012 election: If Obama won, the national debt would double. Our friends and enemies would be reversed because of Obama's peculiar handling of both, and the country would be immensely poorer.

All three have spookily come to pass.

I noted to Director/Writer D'Souza that his arrest on trumped-up charges was a merit badge of honor somewhat analogous to being on the Nixon's Enemies List back in the 70s.  He laughed self-deprecatingly and explained that he goes from campus to campus, encountering klatches of protest signs and students out of the know.  "I am sorry for you, " he told us he smiles at these puny protesting socialists-in-training. "Your understanding of the history of this country is so misinformed. And so limited." 

He regards these peppery encounters as "fun," he says.

When I trundled down to the screening, I noticed aged hippies handling hand-lettered signs against involvement in Iraq, any war, or Israel. As the streets were impassable, again, as a consequence of the President's full-time fund-raising instead of doing the job he was elected to do, I was forced to share the sidewalk with these grizzled throwbacks still in Birkenstocks and sallowing braids.

The film opens July 4, Independence Day -- a nice touch -- a celebration of what is great about the country, even in the teeth of a man who is trying as hard as he can to wrest failure from the most enduringly remarkable endeavor in the history of the globe.

Closing credits are great, featuring a new-mode anthem; and opening credits resemble the great work done on "House of Cards," that Netflix stunner about DC Machiavellians.

I highly recommend the new Dinesh D'Souza salvo at truth, optimism and the melioration of the endless lies proffered by the leftatariat who preach in the nation's wholly-owned radicalized college campii (my version of the plural form -- don't bother with Webster's or Wiktionary).

He goes into the 5 basic lies of America's birth promoted and promulgated by Saul Alinsky, author of  Reveille for Radicals (as well as its more famous successor, Rules for Radicals), the socialist sleaze who was a mentor to Hillary, as well as the guiding muck/light for the current occupant of the Oval Office.  Alinsky does not emerge as a nice person, nor a person a patriot could ever follow.



D'Souza frames the film in the Revolutionary War, and instead of Gen. Washington leading his men into victory against the Redcoats, Washington is shot by a sniper, falls to the ground, and his men surrender. America is not to be.

The Mumbai-born D'Souza, who came here when he was 17, carefully interviews the likes of acidulous America-hater, anti-Zionist cynic Noam Chomsky, captures some of the ugly in another Obama mentor, rapist and muni-bomber William Ayers, one of the ghost-writers of Obama's better "autobiography" (the less-well-written autobio was penned by someone lesser than Ayers, perhaps Obama himself; perhaps not).



It is hard to sit through the first 20 minutes of this merciful film, since it is all chunked up with these reprehensible haters of the US for the nonce. But D'Souza is fair, giving these sordid types leeway to put forth their insidious and untrue misappropriations of non-history.

Relief comes after these professorial historical histrionics are presented. The film carefully goes point for point, shredding the lies and distortions massaged by the adipose-friendly, hirsute Michael Moore and "historians" on major leftard campuses. 


The country's strangulating over-regulation is limned, as is the difficulty even the entrepreneurial spirit has triumphing over the endless asphyxiation of Obama's notion of redistributing the wealth from those who have worked for it to those he thinks should take it, one way or the other. D’Souza goes lightly into the administration's three scandals a week, and tells us about the spying that renders all our emails, telephone calls and everything else we send Open Sesame to the illegal actions of the government. He replays the beloved clips of Obama promising we can keep our doctors and keep our policies -- massive Pinocchios that won the President top liar award for last year.



Dinesh made three predictions before the 2012 election: If Obama won, the national debt would double. Our friends and enemies would be reversed because of Obama's peculiar handling of both, and the country would be immensely poorer.

All three have spookily come to pass.

I noted to Director/Writer D'Souza that his arrest on trumped-up charges was a merit badge of honor somewhat analogous to being on the Nixon's Enemies List back in the 70s.  He laughed self-deprecatingly and explained that he goes from campus to campus, encountering klatches of protest signs and students out of the know.  "I am sorry for you, " he told us he smiles at these puny protesting socialists-in-training. "Your understanding of the history of this country is so misinformed. And so limited." 

He regards these peppery encounters as "fun," he says.

When I trundled down to the screening, I noticed aged hippies handling hand-lettered signs against involvement in Iraq, any war, or Israel. As the streets were impassable, again, as a consequence of the President's full-time fund-raising instead of doing the job he was elected to do, I was forced to share the sidewalk with these grizzled throwbacks still in Birkenstocks and sallowing braids.

The film opens July 4, Independence Day -- a nice touch -- a celebration of what is great about the country, even in the teeth of a man who is trying as hard as he can to wrest failure from the most enduringly remarkable endeavor in the history of the globe.

Closing credits are great, featuring a new-mode anthem; and opening credits resemble the great work done on "House of Cards," that Netflix stunner about DC Machiavellians.