Amnesty = Extinction

On January 28, 2013, a group of Republicans in Congress decided to close down the Republican Party. Their "going out of business sale" involves converting an estimated 12 to 20 million trespassing illegal aliens into solidly-Democrat voters. Republicans will ensure Democrat control of Congress and the White House with millions of new voters for generations to come.

Will there really be 12 to 20 million new Democrat voters? No. Have you heard of "chain migration?" Each new citizen can petition to bring their immediate and extended family with him. So we are talking about perhaps an eventual 40 million new Democrat voters. Now might be the time to mention that your author is an attorney who has represented legal immigrants who go through the process honorably. "Chain migration" is real. And that's in addition to the millions more who will be encouraged to also stampede the border.

Moreover, Democrats are running a strategy to repeatedly incite divisions within the Republican Party. And Republicans are falling for it. Instead of the GOP uniting around common causes, signing on to an amnesty plan severely divides the party. Democrats plan to divide and conquer.

In the 2014 elections, Democrats will take control of Congress if most Republicans vote for this amnesty plan. The tea party movement was formed on the belief that neither the Democrats nor the Republican establishment could be trusted. Suddenly Republicans pretended to repent of their past sins. So most of the tea party decided to return to the GOP -- though with suspicions -- only so long as Republicans might be starting to truly care about the country's financial future. Recent votes on the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling raise grave doubts.

The question is now being reopened as to whether the tea party should form its own political party and abandon the GOP. A civil war has simmered beneath the surface within the tea party since 2009 over whether to work within the GOP. The Northern Virginia Tea Party split in two over this issue. One group wanted to re-elect congressmen like Virginia's Frank Wolf. The other group wanted to trash them as big-spenders by campaigning for independent spoilers. That group cost Republican Keith Fimian a congressional seat. The scalps on the wall of Mike Castle and Dick Lugar may soon be joined by Mitch McConnell and others.

In 2006, Republicans fired their leaders in Congress for two reasons: George Bush's amnesty proposal and drunken-sailor spending by Republicans. Machiavellian Karl Rove and Senator John McCain pushed the same amnesty plan then. The conservative grassroots sat on their hands during the 2006 elections, handing congress to Democrats. Yes, it's true that the bill only came to a vote in 2007. But the push for amnesty did anger and demoralize conservatives from 2004 through 2007.

On the other hand, Republican insiders argue that the Republican Party will become extinct if it does not win over a growing population of Hispanic citizens. If the GOP alienates the Hispanic vote, it will grow increasingly irrelevant.

So, the GOP faces two possibilities. Both predict the GOP's extinction. We face two choices: Pandering? Or persuading? Can the GOP win Hispanic votes by pandering? Or is persuasion required?

First, GOP strategists ignore the influence of the biased Spanish-language news media in the U.S.A. Citizens who get their news in Spanish aren't listening to Rush Limbaugh or conservative publications. They are told that Republicans hate them and they believe it.

Hispanic voters are voting Democrat because they are being deceived and confused. GOP "strategists" (no laughing please) forget that if a tree falls in the forest, and the news media doesn't report the happening, politically it didn't happen. Our country needs a Spanish-speaking Hispanic Rush Limbaugh and Spanish translations of conservative publications.

Second, persuasion will still be necessary. The GOP won't win Hispanic votes auto-magically. Hispanics are going to continue to vote Democrat until they are persuaded otherwise. Either way, the GOP elite is going to have to learn how to persuade politically. There is something about the gentile culture of GOP insiders that resists changing minds.

Third, there are good arguments if Republicans would learn how to persuade. For example, those citizens most likely to be harmed by a flood of new low-wage workers are other Hispanics. Hispanics have a soft spot for fellow Hispanics when jobs are plentiful. But if the U.S. sinks into a double-dip recession, the job that an illegal alien takes will probably by another Hispanic voter's job. Would Spanish-language advertisements get this point across? We'll never know.

Fourth, GOP insiders imagine that voters can be fooled if Republicans are almost as Democrat as the Democrats. Suppose there is a new soft drink, Karl Rove Cola. It tastes almost as good as "The Real Thing" -- Coca-Cola. Why would anyone stop buying Coca-Cola? Why would Democrat-leaning voters choose Karl Rove Cola when they can simply buy their favorite instead? Republicans can never win by being the second-best Democrat in the race. Voters who are persuaded by the Democrat agenda will vote for the Democrat every time.

We face a choice between two mutually exclusive scenarios for the Republican Party, which reveal assumptions about politics. One approach is to persuade all voters why the GOP agenda is better for them and that Democrat appeals are wrong. The other approach is to pander and copy the Democrat pattern of buying votes with giveaways.

The amnesty push exposes a lack of interest among GOP insiders in political persuasion. And that is the biggest reason the GOP will fade into extinction.

Virginia attorney Jonathon Moseley leads American Border Control and is active in the Northern Virginia Tea Party.

On January 28, 2013, a group of Republicans in Congress decided to close down the Republican Party. Their "going out of business sale" involves converting an estimated 12 to 20 million trespassing illegal aliens into solidly-Democrat voters. Republicans will ensure Democrat control of Congress and the White House with millions of new voters for generations to come.

Will there really be 12 to 20 million new Democrat voters? No. Have you heard of "chain migration?" Each new citizen can petition to bring their immediate and extended family with him. So we are talking about perhaps an eventual 40 million new Democrat voters. Now might be the time to mention that your author is an attorney who has represented legal immigrants who go through the process honorably. "Chain migration" is real. And that's in addition to the millions more who will be encouraged to also stampede the border.

Moreover, Democrats are running a strategy to repeatedly incite divisions within the Republican Party. And Republicans are falling for it. Instead of the GOP uniting around common causes, signing on to an amnesty plan severely divides the party. Democrats plan to divide and conquer.

In the 2014 elections, Democrats will take control of Congress if most Republicans vote for this amnesty plan. The tea party movement was formed on the belief that neither the Democrats nor the Republican establishment could be trusted. Suddenly Republicans pretended to repent of their past sins. So most of the tea party decided to return to the GOP -- though with suspicions -- only so long as Republicans might be starting to truly care about the country's financial future. Recent votes on the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling raise grave doubts.

The question is now being reopened as to whether the tea party should form its own political party and abandon the GOP. A civil war has simmered beneath the surface within the tea party since 2009 over whether to work within the GOP. The Northern Virginia Tea Party split in two over this issue. One group wanted to re-elect congressmen like Virginia's Frank Wolf. The other group wanted to trash them as big-spenders by campaigning for independent spoilers. That group cost Republican Keith Fimian a congressional seat. The scalps on the wall of Mike Castle and Dick Lugar may soon be joined by Mitch McConnell and others.

In 2006, Republicans fired their leaders in Congress for two reasons: George Bush's amnesty proposal and drunken-sailor spending by Republicans. Machiavellian Karl Rove and Senator John McCain pushed the same amnesty plan then. The conservative grassroots sat on their hands during the 2006 elections, handing congress to Democrats. Yes, it's true that the bill only came to a vote in 2007. But the push for amnesty did anger and demoralize conservatives from 2004 through 2007.

On the other hand, Republican insiders argue that the Republican Party will become extinct if it does not win over a growing population of Hispanic citizens. If the GOP alienates the Hispanic vote, it will grow increasingly irrelevant.

So, the GOP faces two possibilities. Both predict the GOP's extinction. We face two choices: Pandering? Or persuading? Can the GOP win Hispanic votes by pandering? Or is persuasion required?

First, GOP strategists ignore the influence of the biased Spanish-language news media in the U.S.A. Citizens who get their news in Spanish aren't listening to Rush Limbaugh or conservative publications. They are told that Republicans hate them and they believe it.

Hispanic voters are voting Democrat because they are being deceived and confused. GOP "strategists" (no laughing please) forget that if a tree falls in the forest, and the news media doesn't report the happening, politically it didn't happen. Our country needs a Spanish-speaking Hispanic Rush Limbaugh and Spanish translations of conservative publications.

Second, persuasion will still be necessary. The GOP won't win Hispanic votes auto-magically. Hispanics are going to continue to vote Democrat until they are persuaded otherwise. Either way, the GOP elite is going to have to learn how to persuade politically. There is something about the gentile culture of GOP insiders that resists changing minds.

Third, there are good arguments if Republicans would learn how to persuade. For example, those citizens most likely to be harmed by a flood of new low-wage workers are other Hispanics. Hispanics have a soft spot for fellow Hispanics when jobs are plentiful. But if the U.S. sinks into a double-dip recession, the job that an illegal alien takes will probably by another Hispanic voter's job. Would Spanish-language advertisements get this point across? We'll never know.

Fourth, GOP insiders imagine that voters can be fooled if Republicans are almost as Democrat as the Democrats. Suppose there is a new soft drink, Karl Rove Cola. It tastes almost as good as "The Real Thing" -- Coca-Cola. Why would anyone stop buying Coca-Cola? Why would Democrat-leaning voters choose Karl Rove Cola when they can simply buy their favorite instead? Republicans can never win by being the second-best Democrat in the race. Voters who are persuaded by the Democrat agenda will vote for the Democrat every time.

We face a choice between two mutually exclusive scenarios for the Republican Party, which reveal assumptions about politics. One approach is to persuade all voters why the GOP agenda is better for them and that Democrat appeals are wrong. The other approach is to pander and copy the Democrat pattern of buying votes with giveaways.

The amnesty push exposes a lack of interest among GOP insiders in political persuasion. And that is the biggest reason the GOP will fade into extinction.

Virginia attorney Jonathon Moseley leads American Border Control and is active in the Northern Virginia Tea Party.